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Note that where Scots uses different words to standard received English (whatever you conceive that to be), e.g. "til", "siccer", "ken", "scrieve" (for "to", "sure", "know" and "write" respectively), the Scots words are closer to other Germanic or Scandinavian languages.

Then, is "scrivener" more common in Scots than in English?
Note that where Scots uses different words to standard received English (whatever you conceive that to be), e.g. "til", "siccer", "ken", "scrieve" (for "to", "sure", "know" and "write" respectively), the Scots words are closer to other Germanic or Scandinavian languages.

"scrieve" are you making this up? I am Scottish and in my late forties, admittedly its a few years since I lived in the 'auld country', but until now I have never heard of the word 'scrieve'.

Mind you it is fair to say that I have not heard of a lot of Scots words. My family come from Perthshire. My father was out here in NZ earlier this year and he pointed out a 'croy' to my youngest son. (Ahem, here's a good Scottish name for you, Hamish). I had never heard that word either, apparently it is a waterfall, or more like a weir.
That, and other comments in this thread, leads me to the conclusion that Scots, as she is spoken now, is no more than a regional dialect. Much in the same way Geordie, Yorkshire etc., dialects are.

Kind regards
Bill Ramsay
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
I sure as Hell cannot understand those people!

Etnologue says it is a separate language and they are the last word, I guess..
There must be some Scots who don't consider Scots to ... minority or a majority of Scots, I have no idea.

I'm not sure if it matters.

The ultimate analysis of the Iraqi resistance; lists and analyzes 100 (!) Iraqi insurgent groups:
http://www.iraq-news-net.de/?/news/inn-statements/

The Jewish People's Liberation Organization (JPLO) http://tinyurl.com/2jkeo
The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) http://www.pflp.net /
Note that where Scots uses different words to standard received ... Scots words are closer to other Germanic or Scandinavian languages.

"scrieve" are you making this up? I am Scottish and in my late forties, admittedly its a few years since ... is fair to say that I have not heard of a lot of Scots words. My family come from Perthshire.

For what it's worth, Perthshire is mostly not a traditional Scots-speaking area. It is spoken in the southeast of the shire, including Perth itself, but most of the shire was a Gaelic-speaking area until around 150 years ago, and like most of the highlands, this language was replaced by Scottish Standard English, not Scots.
My father was out here in NZ earlier this year and he pointed out a 'croy' to my youngest son. ... for you, Hamish). I had never heard that word either, apparently it is a waterfall, or more like a weir.

It doesn't seem to be a Scots word at least it's not in the Scots wordlists I've looked at. But it's not Gaelic either. Maybe a very local word? Anyone know?
John.
I sure as Hell cannot understand those people!

make a *** effort then
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I sure as Hell cannot understand those people!

make a *** effort then

you, I do.
I could not understand "Trainspotting" and neither could anyone in my family. And we all did our best. Scots is separate language.
The ultimate analysis of the Iraqi resistance; lists and analyzes 100 (!) Iraqi insurgent groups:
http://www.iraq-news-net.de/?/news/inn-statements/

The Jewish People's Liberation Organization (JPLO)
The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) http://www.pflp.net /
make a *** effort then

you, I do.

your not my type you arrogant ***.
"scrieve" are you making this up? I am Scottish and ... a lot of Scots words. My family come from Perthshire.

For what it's worth, Perthshire is mostly not a traditional Scots-speaking area. It is spoken in the southeast of the ... around 150 years ago, and like most of the highlands, this language was replaced by Scottish Standard English, not Scots.

Interesting that you should say that. Although my paternal family are from Perthshire, (Blairgowrie, Kirriemuir) I was brought up in the Borders (Galashiels) About 40~50 miles from the English border.

The local words, which I never really got used to, were very different from those in Perthshire. 'Glaur' for mud, for example in the Borders. 'Louns' & 'Quines' for boys and girls in Perthshire.

I don't think I ever heard local words spoken in the Borders used in Perthshire and vica versa.
When at school in the early 70's in the borders, we were bored to death with Robert Burns poems in our English class. The real bugger was trying to decode the old middle scots words that he used.

Much the same with ol' willy waggledagger when it comes to decoding and the like. The bane of any schoolboy or girl.
kind regards
Bill Ramsay
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Note that where Scots uses different words to standard received ... Scots words are closer to other Germanic or Scandinavian languages.

Then, is "scrivener" more common in Scots than in English?

But "siccer" and "scrieve" are from Latin. (It's really not that simple.) CDB
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