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{This is a following-up question to the posting named "Prep. verb + prep. object, or V + adverbial PP ??", which was last posted by Casi at 03-06-2005 07:51 PM <-- It would be very appreciated if a moderator transformed this into a HTML form.]

Hello, teachers!

If we have to divide the sentence into breath groups, which is our choice?
1. Subject Verb // Particle Object. ex) The boy looked // after the sheep.
2. Subject Verb Particle // Object. ex) The boy looked after // the sheep.

I think #1 is correct whether or not [Verb + Particle] is a phrasal verb or a free combination.
Am I right?

Thank you very much.
Comments  
Hi, Jandi!

I would say it with the second pattern you showed, although I must say I would not make a very obvious break anywhere at all in such a short sentence.

Similarly, The-boy-took-care-of // the-sheep, not The-boy-took-care // of-the-sheep.

I hope that answers your question.

CJ
Hello Jandi

I can help you about the way of linking to a thread on this forum.
<***>78504<*/***>
But caution! I intentionally put * to avoid the actuation of the hyperlink system.
You should not put the * in <> and when you write actually.

When I delete the four * , it turns to be like;
Prep. verb + prep. object, or V + adverbial PP ??

paco
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Thank you, Jim.
But I still have a question.
In this sentence, is it also true?
The farmers desperately looked at // the hazy sky and passing clouds without rain. [Is this sentence fine?]

Hi, Paco.
Thank you, but I have no idea where we get the number.
I can't find it anywhere.
Please help me again!
Hi Jandi
but I have no idea where we get the number.

If you are using Microsoft IE as your browser, you can now see at the address bar box,
http://www.EnglishForward.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID = 80738
The 80738 is the ID number of this thread "Reply to an Existing Message".

paco
Oh, there it is!
How stupid I am!
I've only searched the window of the main message.

Thank you very much, Paco sensei!
Enjoy a spring cold snap.
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Jandi,

I don't think it's necessary to take a breath anywhere in that sentence. But the stress pattern and groupings would be something like this:

the FARmers / DESperately / LOOKed at the HAzy SKY // and PASSing / CLOUDS without RAIN.

This is just an impressionistic symbolism, by the way. There are no fixed meanings to the slashes and double slash except to suggest smaller and bigger groups.

"passing, rainless clouds" is also a possibility.

Jim
Thank you very much, Jim.
Enjoy the spotless, clear sky and the smell of freshly turned earth!