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Looking at the original incident (6/16/1926), the dog was simply described as a "bulldog".

(OK, poor snipping: sorry.) Two matters arise. 1. Is the disgusting sport of coursing hounds set to run after a released hare still allowed in the US? 2. Do these sources know the difference between a bulldog and a bull terrier?

(restoring the poor snipping)
... when an animal known as a species of pit bulldog or pit bull terrier badly mauled a child ...

I remember having read that "bulldog" was used by some people to mean "fighting dog", retaining an ancient meaning: as you probably know, the ancient bulldog was a dog bred to fight bulls, and, as some ancient paintings and engravings show, its physical conformation was more similar to modern pitbulls than to modern bulldogs.

In the original, the dog's breed is qualified by the word "pit"; I think it indicates that the poor beast was used in the abomination of dog figting.

The modern bulldog seems an example of a breed in which its genetic overaggression has been successfully bred out; most bulldogs are nice dogs.
(The latter stems from a cross or crosses between bulldog and terrier. If anybody tries to tell you that Staffies weren't bred for aggression and tenacity, by all means refer him to me.)

If too many are referred to you, you can refer some to me.

Javi
If you only allow blue-eyed people to mate, after one generation there won't be any more brown-eyed people. (More or less.)

I'm interested, but I don't quite understand you. Do you mean that blue-eyed parents will only have blue-eyed children? Can two parents with light blue eyes have a child with dark brown eyes?
Breeding out the gene for blue eyes would be trickier, but could be accomplished over not too many generations by ... (You can make it go faster by also not allowing brown-eyed people mate unless they have, say, three brown-eyed siblings.)

I believed that the eyes' color inheritance was a lot more complex, as the many different hues seem to imply.

Javi
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While he is biting the child would be my only opportunity to kill him, and it also seems the most ... it is pointed enough so that it won't slip and hit the kid, I will consider going after the throat.

It seems that you have also decided to use the 10" knife. Bear in mind that a knife that long can easily break its blade if it hits bone, unless the blade is quite thick. Also, stabbing the belly is not very effective in killing or even quickly disabling an enraged beast; your best target in the belly is the liver, if you are successful severing some of the mayor veins or anteries around the liver, the beast will be disabled in one or two minutes. Your best approach should be from behind, and do not stay at its mouth reach after stabbing: approach the beast from behind, stab it and go back, reapeat as necessary.
If I were you, I would use the 4" knife, that is quite capable of killing the beast if properly used, and less prone to breaking its blade. I would try what in Spanish bulfighting is called "la puntilla": a short and sturdy knife is inserted at the base of the cranium, where the first vertebra begins: this kills the beast inmediatly. If it moves too much, you can grab its skin around the neck to better aim the knife; do not be afraid that it would bit you: it is too busy bitting the child, just do not stay at its reach after stabbing it; in case that you miss the critical target, anyway, several piercings in its neck would very probably sever some major arteries and veins, so you can achieve your goal this way too, and the 4" knife is easier to control than a much larger one, meaning that the chances of injuring the child if the knife slides are negigible if you can maintain cool blood.

Also, if you think that litres of blood are messy, you could try first a pepper spray directly and abundantly to the eyes and nose of the beast. That's a bit more risky if used alone, but combined with the knife it can be very the perfect lethal combination against enraged mad dogs; also, some protection (thick cloth) around your left hand (the one you must offer if attacked, supposed you are right-handed and your knife is in your right hand) would be wise if the beast do not run away after being pepper-sprayed.

Javi
If you only allow blue-eyed people to mate, after one generation there won't be any more brown-eyed people. (More or less.)

I'm interested, but I don't quite understand you. Do you mean that blue-eyed parents will only have blue-eyed children?

Yes. (With caveats.)
Can two parents with light blue eyes have a child with dark brown eyes?

Only in the very rare case that both of the parents "really" (genetically) have brown eyes but in both of them there was a developmental abnormality that failed to allow the brown pigment to be expressed.
The basics of eye color inheritance are straightforward and have been known for many years. (The specifics about where the genes live is more recent knowledge.) There appear to be three genes involved, but one of them ("bey2" or "EYCL3" on chromosome 15) is the primary gene and represents the difference between brown and blue (and variants, such as green). This gene comes in two alleles, brown (B) and blue (b), and illustrates simple dominance. You get one gene from each parent, and if either gene is B, you'll have brown eyes, while if both are b, you'll have blue eyes. So if both parents have blue eyes, they are both bb, and so neither has a B to give to a child.

There's another gene on chromosome 19 ("gey" or "EYCL1") which comes in two alleles, green and blue, with green dominant, and which causes a person to have green eyes if EYCL3 would have implied blue. So for purposes of the argument, green eyes can be considered to be blue, since all green-eyed people are bb at EYCL3. Given the names, it probably won't surprise you that there's also an "EYCL2" (or "bey1"), thought to be on chromosome 15. This is described as "central brown", but I haven't found a good explanation of what it does, and there doesn't seem to be a good explanation of hazel or gray.

There are reports of blue-eyed couples having brown-eyed kids, and it's possible that there's another gene out there that keeps brown eyes from being expressed, but enough people have been studied that it seems to me (and I believe is the current model) that it's more likely that in those cases both the parents are "accidentally" (rather than genetically) blue-eyed or that the father is brown eyed, but isn't the person who thinks he's the father.
Breeding out the gene for blue eyes would be trickier, ... brown-eyed people mate unless they have, say, three brown-eyed siblings.)

I believed that the eyes' color inheritance was a lot more complex, as the many different hues seem to imply.

It is a bit more complicated when you take into account other, less frequent, colors, but what I said is pretty much true. If only blue eyed people are allowed to mate, you'll get rid of brown eyes (and anything other than blue eyes) pretty quickly. If only brown eyed people (especially only those with a large number of brown-eyed siblings and no non-brown-eyed siblings) are allowed to mate, you'll reasonably quickly get rid of blue eyes.

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Can two parents with light blue eyes have a child with dark brown eyes?

Only in the very rare case that both of the parents "really" (genetically) have brown eyes but in both of them there was a developmental abnormality that failed to allow the brown pigment to be expressed.

s/both/at least one/g. One of the parents could be genetically blue- eyed.

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(snip excellent explanation about eye color inheritance)
doesn't seem to be a good explanation of hazel or gray.

Here you can read a good explanation (in paragraph 4.2.1):

http://www.police-foundation.org.uk/Publications/GENETIC%20MARKERS.pdf

Some images in (and a quote from):
http://www.biosci.ohio-state.edu/~pfuerst/courses/eeobmg640/reading1eyecolor.pdf

"Although not common, two blue-eyed parents can produce children with brown eyes. The apparently non-mendelian examples of iris colour transmission from parents to offspring, combined with the quantitative nature of iris pigmentation
indicate that the inheritance of this apparently simple trait as a dichotomous value must be reconsidered."
There are reports of blue-eyed couples having brown-eyed kids, and it's possible that there's another gene out there that keeps brown eyes from being expressed,

In some plants,eg petunia, the addition of genes for the violet pigment to plants already producing violet pigment, in the hope that this manipulation would render a more intense violet in the flowers, had the opposite effect: most flowers were variegated (white and violet patches) or albino. It seems that some kind of censorship ("cosuppression" is the technical word) is activated. Maybe something like this can happen in humans. I was hoping that some study show an epigenetic effect in the eye's color, but I can find none.

Javi
Has French got a word for "berry" yet?

Yes. "Une baie" is "a berry." That's the term used in biology, but it also appears to be used as ... synonyms for "berries," and, despite the color reference, "petits fruits rouges" appears to apply to blueberries and blackberries as well.)

How about strawberries? Do they qualify as an instance of the class "les baies"? Of "les petits fruits rouges"?

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Yes. "Une baie" is "a berry." That's the term used ... fruits rouges" appears toapply to blueberries and blackberries as well.)

How about strawberries? Do they qualify as an instance of the class "les baies"? Of "les petits fruits rouges"?

I talked with a native French speaker at one of the French-language conversation groups I attend. She said that "baie" would not be used when speaking of berries not in culinary use, anyway, although the evidence I found on the Web definitely indicates the term is used in botany. For her, berries are "petits fruits": She did not believe that "petits fruits rouges" was used. Since she was French (from Paris), and I had seen "petits fruits rouges" identified on a Belgian Web site as an "official" term, I expect it is either a question of different varieties of French or of different official standards "standards of identity," that sort of thing.

As for whether strawberries are "petits fruits rouges," the Belgian Web page I found which classified blueberries and blackberries among these "little red fruits" did indeed include strawberries as well.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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