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You both watch too much television.

You're probably right, but I'd like to know how your inference follows either of our posts.[/nq]Television, standing in here for the mass media in general, makes a lot of its money by scaring people. Even if there is only a vanishingly small chance of your (one's) ever being anywhere near the kind of dog attack that would require intervention with baseball bats or carving knives (unh), Bob the TV will bring you news of anything resembling one, from anywhere in the world, exaggerating where necessary, in order to give you (one) those feelings of nearby imminent violent danger to loved ones that sell soap better than sex does, especially during Family Viewing Hours.

This can be a source of harmless pleasure to many (you and Meirman did seem to be taking a certain fierce pleasure in the contemplation of justified mayhem), but in the susceptible this kind of emergency preparedness, as in American (TM) villages where everyone goes armed, tends to augment rather than mitigate the carnage. I don't want any child, or any dog, to be attacked and badly bitten; if I were present at such an occurrence, as I never have been and don't expect to be, I would intervene even if that likely meant being bitten myself.

But I'm not going to start packing anything. I might injure a child, or a bystander, or myself, or a dog when other means would have served, and then be a long time recovering from feelings of criminal stupidity. You can't get sponsors to spend much of their lovely money on programs about sensible precautions, although those are the only really responsible approach; so what you see on the subject is mostly scareality TV: toxically disrelevant to real life.
There. I feel better. Time to apologise for the rather snotty tone taken*, perhaps. I don't believe, and have seen no reason to believe, that you (you) or Meirman would behave irresponsibly in such a case. I'm just saying that those shows are bad for you (everybody). That's why I never watch one for more than five (ten) minutes.
*Yes, the passive anonymous. My name is CDB and I am a (former) civil servant.
MWCD11 dates "pit bull" to 1950, under its entry for "American pit bull terrier." Since I don't remember ever having ... that it is only in recent years that the subject has become of general interest to the press and public.

Ford Hamilton's greyhound, Fleetfoot, which was recently brought over from England, received some attention from the sporting element. This dog beat the well-known courser, John L. Sullivan, in a coursing match, held April 11, winning seven consecutive courses, and was for this season examined with considerable interest. W.E. Jeffries's pit bulls, Juch and Zumbro, also received their share of attention from the sporting fraternity present. ( Los Angeles Times , 4/19/1897)
"Pit bull terriers" are also mentioned in a 1905 article on a dog show. Of a boxer:
The Mexican has bulky, well-developed muscles and digs into an opponent after the manner of a pit bull terrior attacking a family house dog. (4/28/1911)
so by then, the phrase must have been sufficiently broadly known and acquired a sufficient reputation that it could be used outsid of dog owner contexts. Another article the next week on the same boxer (Joe Rivers):
Take the pit bull terrier and watch it develop. Before its little teeth have scarecly shown in its mouth it begins to display its fighting proclivities. (5/5/1911)
I don't actually see any news articles on them misbehaving, though. Outside the sports section (and classified ads), the first mention seems to be
Have you a little pit bull in your home?
If you have a litter of pit bull pups they can become film stars overnight for Irving Cummings, who is making "My Mamie Rose" for Universal-Jewel, wants a basketful of 'em for one of the secenes in his picture with Mary Philbin. (sic. I can't get a grammatical reading of that as a single sentence.)
Harvey Gates, author of "Merry-Go-Round," who has written the script for "My Mamie Rose," insists that none other than pit bulls will do, so a trip with Boston terriers or French buls to the stuido will be in vain. (8/26/23)
And
The Mexican Yaquis are on the war trail again.
Whatever else you have to say about them, you will have to take off your hat to the Yaqui as a fighter. He makes a pit bulldog look like a scared rabbit. (7/15/1925)
They hit the letters column in 1926:
Now that the subject of vicious dogs is before the public in flaming print let me place my protest that unruly and dangerous dogs be known and classified as bulldogs the most amiable and dependable of all the species of dogs. The "pitbull" is a mongrel, largely white English terrier and this kind of dog has no standing in dog shows or good dogdom as any blood will do if it produces a vicious fighter to satisfy the desires of the breeders. The "Boston bull" is not a bulldog but a terrier and is properly called a Boston terrier.
The Boston was originally a deliberate cross beween bulldog and a white terrier or "pit bull" and it was many years before he was recognized as a breed at all. (6/24/1926)
... The incident which occurred in a back yard, according to paper reports, when an animal known as a species of pit bulldog or pit bull terrier badly mauled a child is an isolated case for which the parent as well as owner are largely to blame, for was not the dog chained up in the back yard to become a savage guard to property. (6/30/1926)
Looking at the original incident (6/16/1926), the dog was simply described as a "bulldog".

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I don't actually see any news articles on them misbehaving, though. Outside the sports section (and classified ads), the first ... secenes in his picture with Mary Philbin. (sic. I can't get a grammatical reading of that as a single sentence.)

Grammar -
Read the "for" as a "because" that follows a pause (comma or semicolon).
Harvey Gates, author of "Merry-Go-Round," who has written the script for "My Mamie Rose," insists that none other than pit bulls will do, so a trip with Boston terriers or French buls to the stuido will be in vain. (8/26/23)

Rich Ulrich, (Email Removed)
http://www.pitt.edu/~wpilib/index.html
Ford Hamilton's greyhound, Fleetfoot, which was recentlybrought over from England, received some attention from the sporting element. This dog beat ... pit bulls, Juch and Zumbro, Looking at the original incident (6/16/1926), the dog was simply described as a "bulldog".

(OK, poor snipping: sorry.)
Two matters arise.
1. Is the disgusting sport of coursing hounds set to run after areleased hare still allowed in the US?
2. Do these sources know the difference between a bulldog and a bullterrier? (The latter stems from a cross or crosses between bulldog and terrier. If anybody tries to tell you that Staffies weren't bred for aggression and tenacity, by all means refer him to me.)

Mike.
("Followup-To:" header set to alt.usage.english.)
1. Is the disgusting sport of coursing hounds set to run after a released hare still allowed in the US?

According to one page, greyhound racing is legal in 16 states (including Massachusetts, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia, and I'm not sure what others; TWERKIF).
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1. Is the disgusting sport of coursing hounds set to run aftera released hare still allowed in the US?

According to one page, greyhound racing is legal in 16 states (including Massachusetts, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia, and I'm not sure what others; TWERKIF).

I said "coursing", not "greyhound racing". Or is there something about American dog-racing I'd rather not know?

Mike.
a

According to one page, greyhound racing is legal in 16 states (including Massachusetts, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia, and I'm not sure what others; TWERKIF).

I said "coursing", not "greyhound racing". Or is there something about American dog-racing I'd rather not know?

Doesn't dog racing generally comprise dogs chasing after a rabbit or mechanical rabbit? My understandings are based entirely on second or third-hand cultural knowledge.
I understand that dog races of some sort are popular in the UK, as they are in Eastern Massachusetts.
Sort of. The hare has now been replaced with Tom DeLay.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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1. Is the disgusting sport of coursing hounds set to run after a released hare still allowed in the US?

According to one page, greyhound racing is legal in 16 states (including Massachusetts, Oregon, Texas, West Virginia, and I'm not sure what others; TWERKIF).

Florida. We use mechanical dogs and real hares.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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