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Can someone please explain to me the difference between bring and bring on?
Which one should I use in this sentence:
Bring (on) the complex problems.

Thank you! Emotion: smile
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CharlotteCan someone please explain to me the difference between bring and bring on?
Which one should I use in this sentence:
Bring (on) the complex problems.

Thank you! Emotion: smile

'Bring', by itself, is the standard form used for the literal meaning of 'transport something from one place to this place'. 'Bring on' carries the idea that 'I am ready for anything, I am ready to confront, solve, enjoy, etc.' 'Bring on the good times; bring on the challenges of the day.'

In your example, if the teacher, say, is inviting students simply to bring problems to class to be solved, 'bring' is fine. The teacher, or anyone else in a leadership position might use 'bring on' to imply that he or she is happy to 'go to work', to solve any problem.
Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Thanks Philip, so do you think the right thing would be to use bring on in the following sentence: "Bring on the complex problems, we will provide the computational power."
CharlotteThanks Philip, so do you think the right thing would be to use bring on in the following sentence: "Bring on the complex problems, we will provide the computational power."
Absolutely.