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Hi,

Reading Hemingway, I've got a problem with a particular sentence I can't divide to get a meaning of.
Here's the passage :
'Eighty-five is a lucky number,' the old man said. 'How would you like to see me bring one in that dressed out over a thousand pounds?'
The context is that the old man has been fishing without taking a fish for 85 days now. "How would you like to see me..." means surely "Can you imagine that I...", right ? But the rest of the sentence is not understandable to me.
"Can you imagine that I bring one in.." (one fish in ?) And then "dressed out" ??? what does that mean here ?
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Hi Espeland

'How would you like to see me bring one in that dressed out over a thousand pounds?'


'How would you like to see me bring one in' --> Wouldn't you like to see me catch one. The inference is I think you would like that very much.

'... that dressed out over a thousand pounds?' --> The expression 'dressed out' basically means 'weighed' here. More specifically, I think it refers to how much the fish weighed after it was prepared for eating.
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bring one in: catch a fish and bring it from the water (to the boat or dryland)

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dress out

2 of a food animal : to weigh after being dressed <the chicken dressed four pounds> -- often used with out<the steer dressed out to 70 percent of his weight>

(3 Nov. 2007).
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Ok thank you ! what a complicated sentence, though.
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