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Cussons then brought in a management consultant, who workedon managerial and communications skills.

What does "brought in" mean? Does it mean "hire"? thanks.
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Essentially, yes.
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Just a quick note - in American English, if you "hire" someone, you make that person an employee, so that phrase wouldn't work here. Perhaps "engaged" would work instead.
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Comments  
Hi,

Here's an extra comment.

'Bring in' really focuses on 'introduce someone new to the group of people dealing with a particular matter'.

eg The Sales Dept. had a meeting about customer service, and they decided to bring in the Manufacturing Dept.

eg The manager questioned his employees about the theft, and then decided that he needed to bring in the police.

eg Thanks for discussing this problem with me, Tom. I think Mary may have some ideas about this, so let's bring her in.

It it's an outside consultant who is brought in, then of course they need to be paid, but that's not the main focus of the expression.

Best wshes, Clive
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