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If the following two sentences are both correct, do they mean the same thing?

1) Will you get me a glass of water, please?

2) Will you bring me a glass of water, please?

Thank you.

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I'd just add that we use "get" much more than "bring" when we talk about having someone carry things to us within the same general area. "bring" sounds more like someone almost has to get in a car and drive somewhere. It's not a hard and fast rule, but it's a little like this:

Can you get me that notepad on the table?
As long as you're in the kitchen, can you get me a glass of water?

The next time you come over to my place, could you bring the book I lent you?
I'd like you to come to my party Friday night. Bring your girlfriend too.

'bring' can be used as a second choice in the first two examples, but 'get' doesn't work in the last two. That may be because 'get' implies some preliminary action of searching for or preparing in some way the object to be carried.

CJ

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teal lime

If the following two sentences are both correct, do they mean the same thing?

1) Will you get me a glass of water, please?

2) Will you bring me a glass of water, please?

Thank you.

They are both correct, and if you were talking to, say, a waiter, they would mean the same thing.

Under other circumstances get and bring might have slightly different meanings, as bring would mean come to me with the item, while get could mean obtain the item for me, without actually requiring that it be transported to me.

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Comments  

Don't you think that sentence #1 implies that the speaker and the listener are in the same location and, therefore, the verb "get" is required while in sentence #2 the speaker and the listener are in different locations and in this case only "bring" works?

teal lime

Don't you think that sentence #1 implies that the speaker and the listener are in the same location and, therefore, the verb "get" is required while in sentence #2 the speaker and the listener are in different locations and in this case only "bring" works?


No, because a glass isn't what you would normally use to transport water over any great distance, so I assume that they are in the same location.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Dear CJ:

Am I wrong if I say that "get" in the examples above means something like this "to go to a place and bring something back ("a glass of water", for example)?

Again, thank you very much for your kind help.

P.S. How would you translate "andare a prendere" into English?