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If I tell you "Bring the laundry in", where are we physically located?

Thank you.

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I'd say I was in the backyard, having hung the laundry out to dry the old-fashioned way, on a clothesline, and you were in the house.

That's because "bring in" suggests that the destination is an enclosure of some kind.

CJ

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Would the meaning of the sentence change if I used "get" in place of "bring"?

Thanks again for your kind help.

teal lime

Would the meaning of the sentence change if I used "get" in place of "bring"?

No, but I'd use 'get' in a different way. (Idiomatic English is full of surprises.)

It's starting to rain! Hurry up! We've got to get the laundry in!

Fun fact. One of these (struck out below) does not work.

We have to bring the laundry in.
We have to get the laundry in.
We have to bring in the laundry.
We have to get in the laundry.

CJ