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I have a question about the below three expressions.

▹bring (one) to one's feet and bring something to its feet

to make someone or an audience rise up applauding or cheering in approval or in salute to someone or something. (Usually refers to an audience.)

▪ The thrilling climax brought the audience to its/their feet.

▹bring somebody to heel to force someone to obey you

▪ Western politicians opposed the president's effort to bring the Supreme Court to heel.

▹bring you/something to your/its knees to defeat or stop someone or something
▪ Severe oil shortages could bring our economy to its knees.

Among the three explanations, I can figure out why "bring somebody to heel" and "bring you/something to your/its knees" have got their names.

But I cannot get how "bring (one) to one's feet and bring something to its feet" have got it's meaning, to make someone or an audience rise up? Because of the former two expressions, the meaning of the latter is hard to conceive.

Help me!!
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To get to one's feet = to stand up.
To bring to one's feet = to cause one to stand up.

I doubt it gets any clearer than that.
Comments  
Thanks, Mister Micawber.