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What does 'brought up' suggest here?

The rising population has brought up tall buildings in the city.

My guess is tall buildings were put up, appeared or that brought them to city.

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What does 'brought up' suggest here? It's not natural English.

The rising population has brought up tall buildings in the city.

My guess is tall buildings were put up, appeared or that brought them to city.

What does 'brought up' suggest here? I'd guess that the writer means The rising population has caused tall buildings to be erected in the city.

The rising population has brought up tall buildings in the city.

My guess is tall buildings were put up, appeared or that brought them to city.

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BulbulTadaThe rising population has brought up tall buildings in the city.

It is not good English. This is a little better:

A rising population has brought tall buildings to the city.

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Comments  
Right. But if I say the rise in population brought tall buildings up ( meaning to) the city, is it wrong or not natural?
BulbulTadais it wrong or not natural?

Factually, it may be correct. But it is incorrect usage of "brought up."

Jonas was brought up in a typical middle-class family.
BulbulTadathe rise in population brought tall buildings up

A rising urban population gave developers the financial incentive to build high-rise apartment blocks within walking distance of the city center.

A rising population gave city planners a strong motivation to encourage the development of high-density housing in the form of high-rise apartment blocks surrounded by green spaces.

To accommodate a rising population, the city government allocated space throughout the city center for high-rise housing.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Neither do we like a rising population nor like tall buildings even if surrounded by green spaces or even if my English ever gets better! Anyway your answers and alternative sentences count and I go over it. If you can put up buildings why can't something ever bring them up?! This is not a happy situation!
BulbulTadaThis is not a happy situation!

The phrasal verbs must be very frustrating. You must learn them as separate vocabulary words. Here is a good starting place:

https://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/phrasal-verbs-list.htm

You can bring up a subject in conversation, but you cannot bring up a building.

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This list on EnglishClub gives me new insights into some common phrasal verbs. The layout is easy to read. Thanks it feels like reading a new book.

While using computers you click or tap something and that brings up something on screen, that is something appears. But it seems you cannot use bring up in my original sentence to mean appear!

Can you not ask someone to bring something to you by saying, 'Bring it up to me'? Though not natural to say as you have already advised I understood my sentence as the rising population brought tall buildings to the city.

BulbulTada, 'Bring it up to me'?

If someone is on a lower level, you can ask that. For example, your office is on the fifth floor. You boss's office is on the tenth floor. You boss can ask, "Please bring the latest report up to me." You have to get on the lift or climb upstairs.

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