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Hallo teachers!

I was browsing on the Internet and came across the following examples :
Examples
  1. Ben brought a friend home from school today.
  2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside.
  3. Take a credit card with you when you travel to Seattle.
  4. Please bring that chair in here from the dining room.
Source: Capital Community College's
http://webster.commnet.edu/grammar /
---------------------------

I have a confusion about the sentence number 3, I'd have used the verb "bring" instead..

Regards

Instructor 1955
1 2 3
Comments  
Hi,
It depends on the point of reference (POR) of the speaker:
If the destination is the same as the POR, use bring.
If the destination is different from the POR, use take.

Ben brought a friend home from school today. (POR: home, Destination: home)
Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside. (POR: home, Destination: outside)
Take a credit card with you when you travel to . (POR: home, Destination: Seatle)
Please bring that chair in here from the dining room. (POR: here, Destination: here)

Combined example: The cashier tells the new waiter, “Take this bill to the customer and bring the money back.”

Take this bill - POR: cashier’s counter, Destination: customer’s table.

Bring the money back – POR: cashier’s counter, Destination: cashier’s counter.

Hope that helps,
Hoa Thai
Instructor1955Hallo teachers!

I was browsing on the Internet and came across the following examples :

Examples

  1. Ben brought a friend home from school today.
  2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside.
  3. Take a credit card with you when you travel to Seattle.
  4. Please bring that chair in here from the dining room. Hi Instructor,


  5. 1. Think of 'bring' as 'come', and 'take' as 'go'

    Ben brought a friend home from school today.

    If you're not sure whether to use 'take' or 'bring', rephrase the sentence using 'came'.

    Hence, Ben came home from school with a friend. Therefore, you've to use 'brought'.

    2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside.

    Lucy goes outside with her blanket. Therefore, you've to use 'take'.

    Apply what I've told you to to the third and fourth sentences and see whether you find it easier to choose between 'bring' or 'take'.

    Best wishes

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Instructor1955Hallo teachers!

I was browsing on the Internet and came across the following examples :
Examples
  1. Ben brought a friend home from school today.
  2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside.
  3. Take a credit card with you when you travel to Seattle.
  4. Please bring that chair in here from the dining room.
Source: Capital Community College's
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar /

---------------------------

I have a confusion about the sentence number 3, I'd have used the verb "bring" instead..

Regards

Instructor 1955
Hi Instructor,

There are no hard rules. For # 3, "bring" works fine with the context. May I take / bring a friend with me to the party? Either one is just as good.
Hi Anon

You wrote: There are no hard rules. For # 3, "bring" works fine with the context. May I take / bring a friend with me to the party? Either one is just as good.

Could you please extract the relevant part from your source to show us that your response to question 3 as stated above is correct? I couldn't find anything regarding the rule for the usage of 'take' and 'bring'. Also, explain to the members why either 'take' or 'bring' is correct for the above sentence.

Thank you in advance.
I don't think it's a conflict, YL, just a matter of point of view.

If you are hosting the party, and I'm talking to you, I may ask if I can bring a friend, because I'm thinking of "you" as the ultimate destination, even if we are at a coffee bar while we talk and the party is at your house. I'm thinking about coming to your party and I'm with you.

On the other hand, I may think of your house as the destination, which is NOT where we are right now, and I may use "take." I'm thinking about going (there) to your house for the party.

(I wasn't Anon, but I do see how it could be variable, just depending on how you see the destination.)

Likewise, if I live in Seattle, I may tell you to bring your teddy bear (or whatever it was) because I think of you coming toward me.
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Hi Barbara

What do you think of Instructor's sentences? Would you provide different answers?

  1. Ben brought a friend home from school today.
  2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside.
  3. Take a credit card with you when you travel to Seattle.
  4. Please bring that chair in here from the dining room.


  5. Best wishes.
Mr. Young,

I have been reading on the sideline. You seem to be a polite and helpful guy but your apporach toward learning is too rigid in my opinion. English can be learned and improved by combining other method and resources. Books are good but that's not all there is. People can learn more if they open there eyes are ears. Goodman and you had several lengthy exchanges. I won't get involved with the rights and wrongs, but I do feel that not only do you rely on others qutoation and books reference for answers, also you demand that other do the same. I am sure you have read the coments from few others. Either you had refused to recognize their inputs or you just didn't care, you still keep challenging posters who happended to disagree with you. Based on your reply, you seemed to have disagreed with mine also. So as a coutesy to your reply, I will give you a reference. I have to say, in principle, you are also correct but mind you, this reference is one you may not like.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

Bring and Take

Contrary to what some might believe, "bring" and "take" are oftentimes interchangeable. While there may be those who prefer to observe a distinction between "bring" and "take", it does not mean that those who do not observe this distinction are wrong.

Oftentimes the choice between "take" and "bring" depends on the speaker’s point of view.


  1. 􀂾 He brings his lunch to work every day.

    1. • emphasizes movement in the direction of the destination


    2. 􀂾 She takes her lunch to work every day.

      1. • emphasizes movement away from the starting point


      2. This is the idea: "They take their lunch away from home. They bring their lunch to their workplace.


        1. 􀂾 It’s going to rain. Remember to take an umbrella with you.

          1. • carry it with you from the point at which you start


          2. 􀂾 It’s going to rain. Remember to bring an umbrella with you.

            1. • carry it with you to your destination


            2. 􀂃 take away – go away – go from – leave – remove

            3. 􀂃 bring to – go to - come to – arrive – put

              Usage Note excerpt from The American Heritage Dictionary, Bartleby.com

              http://www.bartleby.com/61/51/B0485100.html



              USAGE NOTE:

              In most dialects of American English bring is used to denote motion toward the place of speaking or the place from which the action is regarded: Bring it over here. The prime minister brought a large retinue to Washington with her. Take is used to denote motion away from such a place: Take it over there. The President will take several advisers with him when he goes to Moscow. When the relevant point of focus is not the place of speaking itself, the difference obviously depends on the context. We can say either The labor leaders brought or took their requests to the mayor's office, depending on whether we want to describe things from the point of view of the labor leaders or the mayor. Perhaps for this reason, the distinction between bring and take has been blurred in some areas; a parent may say of a child, for example, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school. This usage may sound curious to those who are accustomed to observe the distinction more strictly, but it bears no particular stigma of incorrectness or illiteracy. •The form brung is common in colloquial use in many areas, even among educated speakers, but it is not standard in formal writing.

              http://www.bartleby.com/64/C003/053.html American Heritage Dictionary

              A parent may say of a child, for example, She always takes a pile of books home with her from school, as the parent imagines the situation from the child’s viewpoint. This usage may sound curious to those who are accustomed to observe the distinction more strictly, but there is really nothing wrong with it.

              Here is how "bring" and "take" function.

              bring – indicates movement towards something – bring to

              take – indicates movement away from something – take away


              1. 􀂾 Bring it over here. Bring it over there. Take it over there.

              2. 􀂾 But not: Take it over here. – in the sense of moving something away

              3. 􀂾 Please take the trash away. Remove it from this place. Take it away from where it is now.

              4. 􀂾 Please bring the pizza over here. Put it over here.

                1. • over here = where the speaker is


                2. 􀂾 Please bring the pizza over there. Put it over there.

                  1. • over there = another place


                  2. 􀂾 Please take the pizza away.

                    1. • meaning "Put it in another place. Remove it."


                    2. 􀂾 Please take the pizza over there. Remove it from where it is and put it over there.

                      1. • Remove it. = Take it from this place.


                      2. 􀂾 But not: Please take the pizza over here. Take the pizza here.

                      3. 􀂾 Please take the pizza to my house. You wouldn’t say this if you were at your house.

                      4. 􀂾 Please take the pizza to my house. If you were somewhere else, then you could say this.

                      5. 􀂾 Your "house" can be "here" or "there". Take the pizza there. But not: Take the pizza here.



                      6. 􀂾 Your "house" can be "here" or "there". 1. Bring the pizza here. 2. Bring the pizza there. You could say either one of these sentences depending on where you are.

                      7. 􀂾 Take it from the pizzeria and bring it to my house. Deliver it to my house. Bring the pizza to my house.

                      8. 􀂾 You could say, "Take the pizza to my house." if you are not at home. Deliver the pizza to my house.

                        © Copyright Steven David Bloomberg 2004-2005 – An ESL/EFL Article from LTE























Yoong LiatHi Barbara

What do you think of Instructor's sentences? Would you provide different answers?

  1. Ben brought a friend home from school today. 90% of the time, I'd say "brought." Perhaps if two teachers were talking about the new boy, Ben, and how nice it is that he's making friends, in which Ben and the friend were going away from the speakers.
  2. Lucy takes her blanket with her when she goes outside. - I could go either way on this one. It doesn't say she goes away from me, nor toward me.
  3. Take a credit card with you when you travel to Seattle. Take, unless you are coming to visit me in Seattle and that's my point of view.
  4. Please bring that chair in here from the dining room. - This one is so clear - by saying "in here" it's clear the movement is toward the speaker, so "bring" is the only one that makes sense


  5. Best wishes.
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