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Grammar studies still have my attention. Recently, I spend $132 on books and all were on on grammar, but for David Brinkley's book.

Shirley, the man is a masochist.

Humans are masochist, generally. It is because of the pain of child birth, that we have evolved a capacity to bounce back quickly from pain. No gain without mild discomfort goes the new cliche, but the reality is no people without blood, toil, and tear, and making up, and making out. It is deep in our genetics to be masocist. It effects education, humor, politics, and all manner of group dynamics. It is base, it won't go away like a crying newborn won't go away.
John Freck
Who do you think merits my attention and why? Which ... suggestion list are: Charles Karault, Mike Royko (wroteBoss), Arnie Pile.

Add Alistair Cooke.

That's a good one, Alistair Cooke. I remember one documentary he did on the United States around 1976, it was excellent. Since someday, I might return to over-the-road tour bus driving, I'm particularly interested in great travel journalism, and classic fiction with a strong regional attachment. That also complements my interest in photography.
John Freck
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You're in a rough group here if you make it that way. Most of the people here (and I do not include myself in that "most") are more than very good at grammar and punctuation. Most will forgive or overlook basic errors (like the incorrect usage of commas before and after Jim Murray's name in the above and that extra one stuck between "that" and "I'm") if you are candid about your weaknesses.
When you start defending what is patently wrong you'll be eaten alive here. In matters of punctuation and grammar, it's far better here to assume that the criticism is deserved. You can defend what you think you said, but not how you said it.
The "How should I have written it?" approach usually produces soft answers. Take comfort in there's something that you do that you can do far better than anyone else here can do. It's just that it's not grammatical construction.
Shirley, the man is a masochist.

Humans are masochist, generally. It is because of the pain of child birth, that we have evolved a capacity to ... politics, and all manner of group dynamics. It is base, it won't go away like a crying newborn won't go away.

Good reasoning, John, but can't we say with some assurance that the pain of being rudely thrust into this world is mere child's play compared with the pain of studying grammar?

Charles Riggs
Email address: chriggs¦at¦eircom¦dot¦net
Humans are masochist, generally. It is because of the pain ... it won't go away like a crying newborn won't go away.

Good reasoning, John, but can't we say with some assurance that the pain of being rudely thrust into this world is mere child's play compared with the pain of studying grammar?

I can't say that I remember any pain when I was rudely thrust into the world, Charles. My mother rather selfishly kept it all for herself, I imagine. But I certainly do remember the pain of raps on the knuckles with a bunch of rulers by one of my teachers of English. He didn't discriminate; everyone in the class had the treatment from time to time. It taught one the meaning of 'protective camouflage' in a very practical way.

wrmst rgrds
Robin Bignall
Quiet part of Hertfordshire
England
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.