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Longbenton is in the North East. The Dept of Work ... of North East dialect and accent if you ring up.

"if" you ring up? We ex-pats (and not only us, in fact: any foreign national who has worked in the ... didn't "expect to encounter the full range...". That said, the actual paperwork was very quickly and very efficiently done. DA

When did you stop being a patriot? Are there any expats in your neighbourhood? Could you not try Email?

John Dean
Oxford
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(Snip)>

"The fact remains it is not what you say, but ... http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/uk news/scotland/3147402.stm Published: 2003/09/29 00:40:17 GMT © BBC MMIII

Wonder from what part of Scotland Mr. Aziz hails? Cheers, Sage

From the clip accessible at http://www.azizcorp.com / I would say he's more Home Counties. (Actually, he was born in Pakistan. He had a distinguished journalistic career with the BBC, ITV and C4 before founding his own company)
I'm not sure if you were being 'funny' (for any dictionary definition of the word) but it's perfectly common on TV here to see people who, from their appearance and / or name, have their ethnic origins a long way from Caledonia but who nevertheless have the patter of the Scots born (which, of course, they are).
There's one sharp young solicitor who gets a lot of airtime and whose name escapes me who epitomises this. Tony Osoba (MacLaren in Porridge) is one of several black Scots actors who sound more Scottish than Tony Blair. Mind you, *I* sound more Scottish than Tony Blair.
Same is true all over the UK. Some may find it jarring to see young Muslims in traditional dress expressing themselves in purest Brummie, but it's part of the rich tapestry. And listen out for Samantha Mumba giving an interview.
And if you want plummy Brit, I'd go no further than Don Warrington (ex Rising Damp)

John Dean
Oxford
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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
From the clip accessible at http://www.azizcorp.com / I would say he's more Home Counties. (Actually, he was born in Pakistan. He ... themselves in purest Brummie, but it's part of the rich tapestry. And listen out for Samantha Mumba giving an interview.

Having grown up in a town with hardly any non-white inhabitants (there was a single family of Indian children in my school, whose father was a research chemist), I was taken aback on moving to Manchester in 1975 to discover black and Asian teenagers with strong Mancunian accents. But the surprise only lasted a few weeks; nowadays I would be somewhat taken aback if they didn't have Mancunian accents.
Furthermore, I do not watch TV news, preferring to get my news from the radio. I frequently find that people whose voices I have known for for a long time have entirely the wrong ethnic background for my mental picture of them. It was years before I discovered that Frank Bruno was black.
We discussed this here many moons ago - one of the US contributors made a point of underlining my report that most UK people speak their local accent rather than an "ethnic" accent. I wonder if I can google for it?
Yes, I can. Oooh, look, you were a party to the discussion: http://tinyurl.com/p625
And if you want plummy Brit, I'd go no further than Don Warrington (ex Rising Damp)

One of my favourite English actors. He played God in a cycle of Mystery Plays broadcast on Channel 4 about 15 years ago; wonderful.

David
==
Does exactly what it says on the tin.
From the clip accessible at http://www.azizcorp.com / I would say he's more Home Counties.

Furthermore, I do not watch TV news, preferring to get my news from the radio. I frequently find that people ... wrong ethnic background for my mental picture of them. It was years before I discovered that Frank Bruno was black.


Does it ever happen in the USA that a Sikh in full ethnic garb with bristling whiskers, full 5 Ks, hoves up on a chat show and delivers himself of a line like ''Ma grandpappy come here from the Pun-jab an' he told me hisself that ever' Democrat he ever saw was up to no good'?
John Dean
Oxford
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And if you want plummy Brit, I'd go no further than Don Warrington (ex Rising Damp)

One of my favourite English actors. He played God in a cycle of Mystery Plays broadcast on Channel 4 about 15 years ago; wonderful.

He's lovely. And one of my choices (as if I'll have any say) for the next Dr Who.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Don't the Home Counties constitute a region?

I hope this isn't seen as a stoopid question, but why are they called the "Home Counties", anyway? Don't the millions of UK residents who do not make their home in the Greater London area find this term ridiculous or even insulting? Or is there some significance to 'Home' here that I'm missing?
Trying to think of something not entirely dissimilar in the US, I suppose there's the way "the Heartland" is used to refer to some portion of the perceived geographic and/or cultural interior of the country. But those of us who aren't from "the Heartland" don't mind this because we wouldn't especially want to be associated with "the Heartland". And "Home" is such a more basic and universally-liked concept.
(Snip)> Wonder from what part of Scotland Mr. Aziz hails? Cheers, Sage

From the clip accessible at http://www.azizcorp.com / I would say he's more Home Counties. (Actually, he was born in Pakistan. He ... want plummy Brit, I'd go no further than Don Warrington (ex Rising Damp) John Dean Oxford De-frag to reply

Funny? Me? No. Just asking.
Cheers, Sage
(Snip)> Wonder from what part of Scotland Mr. Aziz hails? Cheers, Sage

From the clip accessible at http://www.azizcorp.com / I would say he's more Home Counties. (Actually, he was born in Pakistan. He ... Mumba giving an interview. And if you want plummy Brit, I'd go no further than Don Warrington (ex Rising Damp)

I hired Don Warrington once for a voiceover, and was even happier with his neo-George-Sanders True Brit accent than I suspect I would have been even if my knee-jerk original choice had been available: Peter "Jason King" Wyngarde.
Paul Boeteng (sp?) and Tariq Ali also come to mind as further examples of non-peaches-and-cream Oxbridge.
**
Ross Howard
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Don't the Home Counties constitute a region?

I hope this isn't seen as a stoopid question, but why are they called the "Home Counties", anyway? Don't the millions of UK residents who do not make their home in the Greater London area find this term ridiculous or even insulting?

Yes. I'd probably have used "the London sprawl" or "suburbia" if I hadn't been quoting. "The Home Counties" is only one notch on the gauge of my irkometer below "the North country".
Or is there some significance to 'Home' here that I'm missing?

No.
**
Ross Howard
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