Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London to be able to distinguish someone from Manchester and Liverpool simply by their dialects?

I know the towns are close geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

jouni maho
It's a movie question, really.
Countess: Oh, my nightie is slipping.
James Bond: So is your accent. Manchester?
Countess: Close. Liverpool.
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Thus spake Jouni Filip Maho:
Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London to be able to distinguish someone from Manchester and Liverpool simply by their dialects?

Yes.
I know the towns are close geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

Perhaps in from your point of view. From a British point of view, London is a whole day's journey from Manchester (Liverpool is even further, though it still takes a day from your travel schedule), and may just as well be in a different country.
It's a movie question, really. Countess: Oh, my nightie is slipping. James Bond: So is your accent. Manchester? Countess: Close. Liverpool.

If that is in the film, then it shows gross ignorance of the experience of Britishness. Britons, especially educated, cultured Britons such as Bond, would not confuse Manchurian and Liverpudlian dialects.

Simon R. Hughes
Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London to be able to distinguish someone from Manchester and Liverpool simply by their dialects? I know the towns are close geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

Actually, no (to your assumption). The Liverpool accent (aka the Scouse accent) is very distinctive. The Manchester accent is less so, and most people from other parts of Britain would find it hard to distinguish a Manchester accent from one of the surrounding region northwest England.
jouni maho It's a movie question, really. Countess: Oh, my nightie is slipping. James Bond: So is your accent. Manchester? Countess: Close. Liverpool.

Don't remind me.
Matti
a southerner who worked in Manchester for a while
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Britons, especially educated, cultured Britons such as Bond, would not confuse Manchurian and Liverpudlian dialects.

Some Britons might confuse Manchurian and Mancunian, though.

Matti
Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London to be able to distinguish someone from Manchester and Liverpool simply by their dialects? I know the towns are close geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

The Liverpool accent is possibly the most distinctive of all the English accents. It couldn't be mistaken for any other, and yes it would be known by a Londoner as it would be by anyone in the country. Manchester is not quite so distinctive to me, but I could distinguish it from, say, Leeds.

Some other towns with their own accents are Newcastle, Birmingham and Bristol.
Louisa
Essex, England, Europe
Thus spake Jouni Filip Maho:

Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London to be able to distinguish someone from Manchester and Liverpool simply by their dialects?

Yes.

Thanks.
I know the towns are close geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

Perhaps in from your point of view.

Well... I only looked quickly in my pocket atlas.
London-Manchester = 2,1 cm
London-Liverpool = 2,3 cm
Manchester-Liverpool = 0,4 cm
Close enough to be dialectally confusable; or so it would seem.
It's a movie question, really. Countess: Oh, my nightie is slipping. James Bond: So is your accent. Manchester? Countess: Close. Liverpool.

If that is in the film, then it shows gross ignorance of the experience of Britishness. Britons, especially educated, cultured Britons such as Bond, would not confuse Manchurian and Liverpudlian dialects.

That's what my intuition told me. It's from "For Your Eyes Only".

jouni maho
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Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London ... geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

Actually, no (to your assumption). The Liverpool accent (aka the Scouse accent) is very distinctive. The Manchester accent is less ... of Britain would find it hard to distinguish a Manchester accent from one of the surrounding region northwest England.

Interesting.
It's a movie question, really. Countess: Oh, my nightie is slipping. James Bond: So is your accent. Manchester? Countess: Close. Liverpool.

Don't remind me.

I take it you don't like Bond movies?

jouni maho
Would it be easy for a Brit, say, from London ... geographically, so I assume the associated dialects are close, too.

The Liverpool accent is possibly the most distinctive of all the English accents. It couldn't be mistaken for any other, ... but I could distinguish it from, say, Leeds. Some other towns with their own accents are Newcastle, Birmingham and Bristol.

This makes it ever so curious why movie team (a British one) would have slipped that piece of dialogue into the film.
Ah well.

jouni maho
Thus spake Jouni Filip Maho:

Manchurian, eh? No, no: You're thinking of Klein's Kosher Korean Restaurant in Piccadilly.
Cheers, Sage
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