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what's this? what does it mean?

thanx in advance

Elida
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Anonymouswhat's this? what does it mean?

thanx in advance

Elida
In my experience, if one "paints" a person with a "broad brush", it is to use very general, even stereotypical, terms. If describing a minority of whatever nature, the "painter" ignores any personal or individual indications and classifies the person in the broadest of categories.
Philip
Anonymous
what's this? what does it mean?

thanx in advance

Elida

In my experience, if one "paints" a person with a "broad brush", it is to use very general, even stereotypical, terms. If describing a minority of whatever nature, the "painter" ignores any personal or individual indications and classifies the person in the broadest of categories.
Here's the sentence:

"If the former, the court could adopt a broad brush-stroke approach in determining the shares if the latter, the woman would only have an interest quivalent to the money she had invested"

it doesn't seem to be related to what u said.
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If you describe a situation reduced to its bare bones, you give a broad-brush-stroke description.

This is the only usage in which I have seen this idiom so far.
If you describe a situation reduced to its bare bones, you give a broad-brush-stroke description.

This is the only usage in which I have seen this idiom so far.


If you describe a situation reduced to its bare bones, you give a broad-brush-stroke description.

This is the only usage in which I have seen this idiom so far.

That's interesting, Anon.

I would take the "bare bones" of a situation to be its "core".

"Broad brush strokes" I would take to be a "general picture", on the other hand.

In "bare bones", we focus on the internal essence of something.

In "broad brush strokes", we focus on our external impression of something.

(You could think of it as "Giotto vs Van Gogh".)

MrP

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Anonymous
PhilipIn my experience, if one "paints" a person with a "broad brush", it is to use very general, even stereotypical, terms. If describing a minority of whatever nature, the "painter" ignores any personal or individual indications and classifies the person in the broadest of categories.Here's the sentence:

"If the former, the court could adopt a broad brush-stroke approach in determining the shares if the latter, the woman would only have an interest quivalent to the money she had invested"

it doesn't seem to be related to what u said.
I think Philip was correct, now you must start analyzing yourself your context to eventually adapt the interpretation to it. What you posted here is too incomplete for us to do that.
AnonymousHere's the sentence:

"If the former, the court could adopt a broad brush-stroke approach in determining the shares. If the latter, the woman would only have an interest equivalent to the money she had invested"

it doesn't seem to be related to what u said.

Hello Elida

This means "the court could adopt an approach based on rough estimates".

For instance, the court might say:

"The woman has only contributed 10% in literal terms to the value of X. However, she has supported her husband in his business, raised their children, and maintained the family home. She has therefore contributed indirectly to X, and is thus entitled to a greater share of it than 10%. We would estimate that this share = 45%."

Here, the underlined part would be a "broad brush-stroke" approach.

Let me know if you need any more help!

All the best,

MrP
Marius Hancu
Anonymous
PhilipIn my experience, if one "paints" a person with a "broad brush", it is to use very general, even stereotypical, terms. If describing a minority of whatever nature, the "painter" ignores any personal or individual indications and classifies the person in the broadest of categories.Here's the sentence:

"If the former, the court could adopt a broad brush-stroke approach in determining the shares if the latter, the woman would only have an interest quivalent to the money she had invested"

it doesn't seem to be related to what u said.
I think Philip was correct, now you must start analyzing yourself your context to eventually adapt the interpretation to it. What you posted here is too incomplete for us to do that.
The issue in this case was quantifying the woman's share in barn which had been conveyed into her male partner's name. She had made a substantial contribution to the purchase price of the barn and had also contributed in money and labour towards its subsequent conversion into a home for both parties. Was ther a constructive or resulting trust? if the former, the court could adopt a broad brush-stroke approach in determining the shares but if the latter the woman would only have an interest equivalent to the money she had invested. It was a constructive trust, because of the evidence that there was a common intention to share. So the woman got a one third share, instead of the 19.4 % share which represented her financial contribution.

and what about the word latter (all i know is: The Latter are a race of grey skinned warriors, with armor-plated skin. They reside on the planet ) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latter#Latter

Hope this helps. Emotion: smile
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