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A. Some of us were better at it than others, but it was considered a kind of treat, a game that broke up the school day. You took a sentence, threw it against the wall, picked up the pieces, and put them together again, slotting each word into its pigeonhole. When you got it right, you made order and sense out of what we used all the time and took for granted: sentences.

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1. The underlined, “broke up the school day”, does this mean, “it made the school day happy”? If so, how come it means that?

B. Her mother went on smiling for a moment, and then her hand went to her mouth. She screamed through her hand. Garrish shot through it. Hand and head disappeared in a red spray. The man who had been loading the suitcases broke into a lumbering run.

Garrish tracked him and shot him in the back. He raised his head, looking out of the sight for a moment. Quinn was holding the softball and looking at the blond girl's brains, which were splattered on the NO PARKING sign behind her prone body. Quinn didn't move. All across the mall people stood frozen, like children engaged in a game of statues.

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2. “He raised his head”. Here, I guess “He” does not mean “Garrish”. It means some one else?

3. “looking out of the sight for a moment”. Does this mean “someone could not see, someone’s vision was blocked”? Or does this mean “someone looked through something”?

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Hi,

A. Some of us were better at it than others, but it was considered a kind of treat, a game that broke up the school day. You took a sentence, threw it against the wall, picked up the pieces, and put them together again, slotting each word into its pigeonhole. When you got it right, you made order and sense out of what we used all the time and took for granted: sentences.

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1. The underlined, “broke up the school day”, does this mean, “it made the school day happy”? If so, how come it means that?

It means it interrupted the school day and added some variety to it.

B. Her mother went on smiling for a moment, and then her hand went to her mouth. She screamed through her hand. Garrish shot through it. Hand and head disappeared in a red spray. The man who had been loading the suitcases broke into a lumbering run.

Garrish tracked him and shot him in the back.

He raised his head He looked up. Presumably he was previously looking down a bit.

looking out of the sight for a moment.

The reference is to the sights on the gun. Sights are used to aim the gun. Perhaps the singular is used to suggest a telescopic sight. With regular sights, I would expect one to look over them.

Quinn was holding the softball and looking at the blond girl's brains, which were splattered on the NO PARKING sign behind her prone body. Quinn didn't move. All across the mall people stood frozen, like children engaged in a game of statues.

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2. “He raised his head”. Here, I guess “He” does not mean “Garrish”. It means some one else? No, Garrish.

3. “looking out of the sight for a moment”. Does this mean “someone could not see, someone’s vision was blocked”? Or does this mean “someone looked through something”? See my comment.

Clive
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Thanks a lot, a lot, Clive....
Hi, again...

1. How about, "He looked out of sight". Without "the", from "out of the sight".

Does it mean the same with or without "the"?

2. Garrish tracked "him" and shot "him" in the back. "He" raised his head.

Here, the "he". I didn't know that the "he" in "He raised his head" meant "Garrish". In purely grammatical point, is there no possibility that "he" here, means the man who was being tracked by Garrish?
Hi,

B. Her mother went on smiling for a moment, and then her hand went to her mouth. She screamed through her hand. Garrish shot through it. Hand and head disappeared in a red spray. The man who had been loading the suitcases broke into a lumbering run.

Garrish tracked him and shot him in the back. He raised his head, looking out of the sight for a moment. Quinn was holding the softball and looking at the blond girl's brains, which were splattered on the NO PARKING sign behind her prone body. Quinn didn't move. All across the mall people stood frozen, like children engaged in a game of statues.

1. How about, "He looked out of sight". Without "the", from "out of the sight".

Does it mean the same with or without "the"?

He looked out of sight. This means that he seemed to be in a place where he couldn't be seen.

He looked out of the sight. This suggests the gun sight, but is rather unusual phrasing.

Can it be 'He looked out at the sight'? ie he looked at the scene that was in front of his eyes.



2. Garrish tracked "him" and shot "him" in the back. "He" raised his head.

Here, the "he". I didn't know that the "he" in "He raised his head" meant "Garrish". In purely grammatical point, is there no possibility that "he" here, means the man who was being tracked by Garrish? Yes, that's what it means purely in terms of grammar. Really, it's the meaning that one has to consider. If you assume the 'sight' refers to the gun sight, then it's Garrish. In addition, it seems to me a bit odd to say someone is shot in the back and then go on to say, without further comment, that the shot person raised his head. It's the sight part that makes it confusing.

Is the guy who was shot dead? If so, he is unlikely to raise his head.

Clive
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