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Hello,

He looked at the broken window.

Is it converted into this below one?

He looked at the window broken.

Thanks,

Gooday!
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Do you have any tester for identifying adjectives, comparing Participles?

Is there any Modus Operadi to notice participles used as adjectives ?

You say 'very -ed" "seem -ed' etc.

Can you explain in more easy way?

Thanks!
TasmanTigerCan you explain in more easy way?
I wish!

We native speakers learn it through lots of practice, I'm afraid.
Notice that Jim used multiple tests.

How did your text book explain it in the case of the two post-modifier examples you quoted?
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OK, I'll keep going!

My textbook says :

We often use participles after nouns in order to define or identify the nouns, in the same way as we use identifying relative clauses.

We couldn't agree on any of the problems discussed.

(=...... the problems they were discussed.)

(NOT ....... the discussed problems.)

This is what it says.
They don't seem to give you much help in deciding which ones go where!

They do seem to say that the post modifiers work like a relative clause.
That suggests that you can rephrase them with "which were."

Are you sure about your middle line: the problems they were discussed. ?? That can't be right.

Anyway, if you can say, "the problems which were discussed," then you can say "the problems discussed."
Oh, I misspelled ;' the problems that were discussed '

OK, I understand this one :

the problems discussed -- Correct

However I can't get the picture of this one :

the discussed problems --- Incorrect

Why is this phrase incorrect?

Considering 'broken' usage, it's even more confusing!

the broken window ---- Correct

the window broken ---- Incorrect

Completely opposing usages!

Beyond my recognition!
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I can't come up with a single test which will work in all cases.

Obviously, you can say, "Please replace all the windows which are broken."

But you can't say, "Please replace all the windows broken."
AvangiI can't come up with a single test which will work in all cases.
Me neither, but one avenue of approach, if I were up to it, which I'm not, involves the meaning of the word. For example, those past participles which indicate a change of state seem to require a position in front of the noun.

broken - It was OK. Now it's broken. Its state has changed.
discussed - No state change.

I'm not claiming anything here. Just suggesting an approach if anyone's interested in pursuing this line of inquiry.

CJ
AvangiObviously, you can say, "Please replace all the windows which are broken."

But you can't say, "Please replace all the windows broken."
I'm changing my mind here.

I think in this context, it would be okay to write a memo: We had some vandalism last night. Please replace all windows broken, where the "which were" would be understood.
It focuses more on the act of breaking. (not middle voice) Emotion: big smile

Please take care of all items checked. This qualifier seems to work in both positions!
But the post position stresses the act of checking. (all items which I checked)
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AvangiBut the post position stresses the act of checking.
Yes, I agree that the post-modifier is much more "verby" in most cases. The pre-modifier is pretty static by comparison.

CJ