I guess they couldn't think of anything rhyming with fender..

http://www.bumperdumper.com/bumper2.htm
Is bumper standard in parts of the US? We call it a bumper or bumper bar here in Oz, but newer ones (say post-1990), are only good for crumpling.

I can't see how its attached, but I bet you couldn't fit it to a Ferrari!

Don't you just like: "Use in Disaster Relief, Hurricane and Earthquake preparedness, and other situations where a sanitation situation may occur."

Stupot
1 2 3 4
I guess they couldn't think of anything rhyming with fender.. http://www.bumperdumper.com/bumper2.htm Is bumper standard in parts of the US? We call it a bumper or bumper bar here in Oz, but newer ones (say post-1990), are only good for crumpling.

"Bumper" is a standard term in the US, but it's getting harder and harder to identify the part of the car that is the bumper. Instead of a chromed rail, they are all all-plastic now and it's difficult to tell where the other part of the body stops and the bumper begins. They are no longer protective.
I can't see how its attached, but I bet you couldn't fit it to a Ferrari!

It's fitted into a trailer hitch. http://tinyurl.com/b7bwr That type is called a 2 x 2 hitch because the vehicle has a 2" x 2" hollow square pipe permanently attached. You pull the pin (shown) out and the hitch parts are removable. I have a similar hitch on my vehicle. I can put in my hitch, or I have a bicycle rack that fits into the receiver.
Don't you just like: "Use in Disaster Relief, Hurricane and Earthquake preparedness, and other situations where a sanitation situation may occur."

At least they didn't feel the need to warn you "Do not use when vehicle is in motion".

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
In our last episode,
, the lovely and talented Stuart Chapman broadcast on alt.usage.english:
I guess they couldn't think of anything rhyming with fender..

In the US a "fender bender" is a very minor accident, although bumpers are extremely expensive to repair and replace and many hundreds of dollars in damage may result from an accident at less than five miles per hour - so "minor" is a relative term.
Is bumper standard in parts of the US? We call it a bumper or bumper bar here in Oz, but newer ones (say post-1990), are only good for crumpling.

Exactly. But in a more serious accident, the energy that goes into mangling the bumper is energy that is not transmitted to the bodies of the people occupying the car. Or so the theory goes.

Lars Eighner (Email Removed) http://www.larseighner.com / We are all failures at least, all the best of us are. J. M. Barrie
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I guess they couldn't think of anything rhyming with fender.. http://www.bumperdumper.com/bumper2.htm Is bumper standard in parts of the US? We ... you just like: "Use in Disaster Relief, Hurricane and Earthquake preparedness, and other situations where a sanitation situation may occur."

Around here the "bumper" is the bar (now molded, contoured plastic) that spreads horizontally across the front and back of an automobile that protects it from minor front and rear collisions and "bumps".

A "fender" is (was) the curved metal guard that arcs over the tires to keep mud from flinging everywhere. They were much more prominent on older cars and, before that, carriages. Now the tires on most cars are nested inside the body and this area is more generally referred to as a "quarter panel". But there still are vehicles with good old fenders like some trucks, motorcycles and flatbed trailers.

Don
Kansas City
I guess they couldn't think of anything rhyming with fender.. ... but newer ones (say post-1990), are only good for crumpling.

"Bumper" is a standard term in the US, but it's getting harder and harder to identify the part of the ... difficult to tell where the other part of the body stops and the bumper begins. They are no longer protective.

It's a common BrEtcE misconception that our "bumper" is your "fender", when in fact it's our "mudguard/wing" that's your "fender" and bumpers are bumpers everywhere. I don't know how or when this error got off the ground, but it's surprisingly common.

Ross Howard
"Bumper" is a standard term in the US, but it's ... stops and the bumper begins. They are no longer protective.

It's a common BrEtcE misconception that our "bumper" is your "fender", when in fact it's our "mudguard/wing" that's your "fender" and bumpers are bumpers everywhere. I don't know how or when this error got off the ground, but it's surprisingly common.

Are you replying to me? I don't mistake the word "bumper" for "fender", and I'm fully aware of the meaning of "mudguard" and "wing".

The comment I made above refers to "bumper" in your sense and in my sense.

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
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Are you replying to me?

You and Stuart. And the world. And anyone else who knows me.
I don't mistake the word "bumper" for "fender",

Of course you don't; you're American.

Ross Howard
The why put "BrEtcE"? Is not this "tcE" (Tony Cooper English) invention of Areff's the English of an American?

Tony Cooper
Orlando FL
It's a common BrEtcE misconception that our "bumper" is your "fender", when in fact it's our "mudguard/wing" that's your "fender" and bumpers are bumpers everywhere. I don't know how or when this error got off the ground, but it's surprisingly common.

I'm one of the people who originally misunderstood the AmE usage of "fender".
The reason was probably that I was familar with fender meaning "a cushioning device hung over a shipÂ’s side to protect it against impact". So to me a car fender would be something that protected the body of the car against impact. The most obvious candidate on a car was the bumber.

Peter Duncanson
UK (posting from a.u.e)
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