+0
in what situation would you use burnt/burned?[:^)]
+1
Footnote:

In BrE, you would almost always see the "burnt" form as the adjectival participle, e.g. "burnt toast", "burnt fingers", rather than "burned toast", "burned fingers".

As regards the simple past tense, my impression is that while "burned" and "burnt" may both be found in BrE, the latter is by far the more common.

MrP
Comments  
Both of them are past and past participal of "burn" and can be used interchangeably. Burnt is chiefly British.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
 MrPedantic's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you both tremendously. =)
There are many confusing answers to this question online, with most people saying they are one and the same simply because that's the easy way out. The answer is actually very simple:

Burned is the past sense of burn and is used when the verb has no object, i.e. no noun.



Burnt is used where the verb does have an object.



e.g. The fire burned brightly and She burnt her finger.



So, if there's a noun after it, it's 't', if not it's 'ed'
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
AnonymousBurned is the past sense of burn and is used when the verb has no object, i.e. no noun.

Burnt is used where the verb does have an object.

e.g. The fire burned brightly and She burnt her finger.

So, if there's a noun after it, it's 't', if not it's 'ed'
First time ever I read this. Any references, Anon?

(I've looked it up in a couple of dictionaries, containing also usage notes, and wasn't able to find something like that.)
Hemingway usesboth form mixed. It seems they can be exchanged for one another.

He writes in 'In our times': ...the burnt hillside... but also ...the burned country...

So guess it's all the same. Still strange he doesn't choose one way of writing it.
"verbs: past tenses -t/-ed
Both forms of ending are acceptable in British English , but the -t form is dominant--burnt, learnt, spelt--whereas American English uses -ed: burned, learned, spelled. Contrarily, British English uses -ed for the past tense and the past participle of certain verbs--quitted, sweated--while American English uses the infinitive spelling--quit, sweat. Some verbs have a different form of past tense and past participle, eg, the past tense of dive is dived in British English but dove in American English."
(The Economist Style Guide, 10th ed. Profile Books, 2010)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies