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question: are the players suffering from a burnt-out?

i am describing their state of being hence the adj. no use of tense here.

but in some press headlines, "burn out" is being used, so my understanding is that the reporter is not describing the state but merely following grammatical rules within the context. see link.

link

thank you for your clarification.
Comments  
I can't see where it says "burn out" in the article? Anyway, to describe someone as suffering from burn out is to say that they've been doing to much and are not currently performing to their usual standard.

Burnt out refers to the past - eg "He had two jobs, but in the end, he was burnt out and had to resign from one of his jobs".
'burn out' is a phrasal verb and therefore there is no 't' at the end of the word "burn" when it is placed after a verb e.g. ...work burnout.

however, when one describes a state or condition, a 't' is added to the end of the word 'burn' when it is placed before a noun e.g. ...a burnt-out case.

so, in the above sentence, is it appropriate to say "are the players suffering from a burnt-out?" is 'burnt-out' an adjective sufficient in its own standing without ever the need of another noun by its side?

thank you.
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hello!

i am sorry about the link. this is the right one. link

the headline: "player burn-out to blame for crisis, says...".

thank you.
No. You can't say the players are suffering from a 'burnt' out. 'Burnt' is past of 'burn'. "The players are suffering from burn out" is present. You can't be suffering from something that is in the past. "The players were burnt out" refers to the past.

In the context of the headline "Player burn out to blame for crisis" is correct because the crisis is still going on - it's in the present.

Once the crisis is over, you could say "The crisis happened because the players were burnt out".
hi tidus!

you are correct. "...suffering..." is a present particle therefore it implies the action is still on going and "burn out" is the right usage in this case.

if one was (most likely) to use "burnt out" in a sentence construction like in the above case, the use of any auxillary, or modal verbs must not cause any ambiguity.

the sentence should be rephrased:

are the players burnt-out?

thank you.
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hi tidus!

you are correct. "...suffering..." is a present particle therefore it implies the action is still on going and "burn out" is the right usage in this case.

if one was (most likely) to use "burnt out" in a sentence construction like in the above case, the use of any auxillary, or modal verbs must not cause any ambiguity.

the sentence should be rephrased:

are the players burnt-out?

thank you.
my apology, i just saw this headline, "half of the britons feel burnt out".

is this correct?

link
Yes. It's correct.
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