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Hey Guys,

I just saw a movie, where one cop describes to other one, how an attendant of an "impound lot" figured out, that one car, from his parking lot, was stolen. I just wanna ask you for the clarification of one sentence, which I did not understand. Here is the transcript...

- He got here about 10:00.

- Saw the bus to the gate at auto lot.

- Realized all the keys in the lockbox were missing.

Please what does it mean "bus to the gate" ?? During the digging over the internet I found out, that term "bus gate" could refers to the special gate, which is situated at the many parking lots and which let you through only if you have valid ticket....But I am not sure. In the context of the movie, it wasn't clear what the "bus gate" could be.

- Or could be "bus to the gate" just an crossbar or a sneck?? You know, just an device, which holds parts of the gate together...

Thank you in advance and many thanks for this phorum.

with regards

JCD.
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Was this the combined CSI/Without a Trace episode? I just watched that last night, but I don't remember what he said. It's not any kind of standard idiom or expression. I though he said something about the bus as in the thing people ride on. Something about how they got off the bus at the gate, but I don't remember. Don't turn yourself in knots over this one - you're sure those were his exact words? Weren't the guy and the kid on the bus before that?
When you see someone/something to somewhere you escort them there.

It sounds as though this guy is responsible for security at this site and this looks like a list of his actions.

He arrived around 10.

He let the bus (which bus? I don't know, a bus leaving the site anyway) out of the gate.

Then he found out that the keys had been stolen.
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Grammar GeekWas this the combined CSI/Without a Trace episode? I just watched that last night, but I don't remember what he said. It's not any kind of standard idiom or expression. I though he said something about the bus as in the thing people ride on. Something about how they got off the bus at the gate, but I don't remember. Don't turn yourself in knots over this one - you're sure those were his exact words? Weren't the guy and the kid on the bus before that?
Hi GG,

Was this the combined CSI/Without a Trace episode?

Yes it was...:-). I caught almost everything in this episode, except of this sentence. That's why I'm asking, because I got an impression that it had nothing to do with the Bus as vehicle. Anyway, you mentined an interesting thing..Please what does it mean if the Bus driver drop the passenger at the gate. ??? It's gate an US slang term for the part of the town?

thank you in advance.
No, gate as in a thing in a fence that opens and closes to let people/vehicles/whatever through. Sometimes there may not be a physical gate at all and it is used in the sense of 'entrance to this place'. The bus stop was located near the entrance to something.
Nona The BritWhen you see someone/something to somewhere you escort them there.

It sounds as though this guy is responsible for security at this site and this looks like a list of his actions.

He arrived around 10.

He let the bus (which bus? I don't know, a bus leaving the site anyway) out of the gate.

Then he found out that the keys had been stolen.

It sounds as though this guy is responsible for security at this site and this looks like a list of his actions.

Yes. He secures the cars at the impound lot.

He let the bus (which bus? I don't know, a bus leaving the site anyway) out of the gate.

Exactly. I'm confused as well. Anyway, do you thing, that the bus(in slang) to the gate, could be an item, which holds the doors of the gate together? Im mean, he could have said...He arrived around 10. Saw the sneck of the gate at the auto lot. Realized all the keys had been stolen...?

thank you as well.
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I don't understand why you won't accept this as a literal bus leaving through the gate. It's an impound lot. People come to collect their vehicles from it. Someone collected their bus.

Don't assume that the bus is connected to the missing keys. He just noticed that the keys were missing after dealing with the bus and its owner.
What the heck is a sneck?

I agree with Nona -- I don't think the sentence has some obscure menaing. You don't need to figure out an alternate meaning for "bus to the gate." He saw the bus -- accompanied or observed the bus (a vehicle that people were riding on) to the gate -- until it had reached the gate (an opening in a fence). The bus is not part of the gate. No need for a sneck, whatever that is.
It's an impound lot. Drivers can only remove their vehicles under security. Someone has to let them out.

At some point - around or after dealing with the collection of a bus - he realised that all the keys in the 'lockbox' were missing. Now, what is the lockbox? As he expected there to be several keys in it I'd assume it's the box where all the site's security keys are kept. It could be that he got as far as taking the driver/bus to the gate and then discovered that all the security keys are missing and was unable to open the gate (seems unlikely that the company would store the keys by the gate rather than in an office). It could be that he let the bus out of the gate, returned somewhere else (office?) and discovered that the lockbox had been raided.
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