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Usually, but is regarded as a preposition but sometimes it is used as a conjunction. Rules say that when a preposition word is not followed by an object rather by a pronoun/noun and a verb, the preposition word acts as a conjunction. Consider the following example;

I took the exam but didn't pass it.

Here but is used as a conjunction but there is no subject (noun/pronoun) after but. So, are there any other rules that may help us identify such conjunctions (through construction of the sentence) in a sentence OR there is it just one rule and we also have to consider the understood (implicit) pronoun ( I ) in the sentence.

I tool the exam but didn't pass it. (Now we have a subject + verb construction)

GB
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Hi,

Usually, but is regarded as a preposition but sometimes it is used as a conjunction. I would say that the opposite is the true situation.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
I took the exam but (I) didn't pass it.
"(B)ut there is no subject (noun/pronoun) after but." There is: I.
Ellipsis drives me crazy too when (I am) learning grammar.
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InchoateknowledgeI took the exam but (I) didn't pass it.
"(B)ut there is no subject (noun/pronoun) after but." There is: I.
Ellipsis drives me crazy too when (I am) learning grammar.
OK... forget the noun. Say, when there is a noun or a pronoun with a verb. (Now "I" is a personal pronoun). So does that really make a preposition word a conjunction.

GB
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.
Hmmm... I'll keep that in mind

GB
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