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Everyone has told a lie at one point, but as it contradicts something we know to be true, lies are always exposed, revealing the truth beneath them.
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please explain the use of three commas here.
what is the grammatical form and function "but as" here?
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Jigneshbharatiplease explain the use of three commas here.

Try reading the sentence aloud. Where do you pause?

Jigneshbharatiwhat is the grammatical form and function "but as" here?

"but as" is not a single phrase. The two main parts of the sentence are:

"Everyone has told a lie at one point"
"as it contradicts something we know to be true, lies are always exposed, revealing the truth beneath them"

"but" is a conjunction joining these. "as" means "because".

"it" does not agree with "lies", which is a fault in the sentence.

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Jigneshbharaticommas

Everyone has told a lie at one point,1 but as it contradicts something we know to be true,2 lies are always exposed,3 revealing the truth beneath them.

1) The comma together with the coordinating conjunction but separates two independent clauses, each with an explicitly stated subject (everyone, lies).

2) The comma separates the subordinate clause beginning with as from the following clause.

3) The comma sets off a non-restrictive participle clause analogous to a non-restrictive relative clause with which: which reveals the truth beneath them.

The subject of the participle clause is implicitly something like "the fact that lies are always exposed" because the clause is non-restrictive, i.e., it doesn't relate directly to any preceding noun but to the preceding proposition as a whole. Actually, GPY's "exposure of lies" may be a more accurate way of paraphrasing the subject of that participle clause.

CJ

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Comments  

Thanks. What is the grammatical function of the participle clause-revealing...?

What is the subject of the participle clause?

JigneshbharatiWhat is the grammatical function of the participle clause-revealing...?

I'm not sure. I think traditionally some people have described these types as modifiers of the implied subject, but to me this does not seem convincing. Perhaps someone else can comment on this. If no one comments here then perhaps you could post it as a new question.

JigneshbharatiWhat is the subject of the participle clause?

It does not have a true grammatical subject. Structurally, the implied subject is "lies". However, it seems to me that semantically the implied subject is something more like "the exposure of lies".

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
Thank you!