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Hi,
this is probably a stupid question... but I'd like to ask it anyway Emotion: big smile

Is it ok to use but and though in the same clause or sentence? I think it's ok and doesn't sound bad, although it's probably redundant. An example could be:

I really liked those gadgets, but I didn't buy any, though.

Thanks Emotion: smile
Comments  
KooyeenHi,
this is probably a stupid question...but I'd like to ask it anyway Emotion: big smile

Is it ok to use but and though in the same clause or sentence? I think it's ok and doesn't sound bad, although it's probably redundant. An example could be:

I really liked those gadgets, but I didn't buy any, though.

Thanks Emotion: smile

Kooyeen, surely you know by now that on these boards there are no stupid questions. Emotion: smile I think your assessment of redundancy is correct; use one or the other, but not both.
Thanks.
So you mean using both would sound odd? Emotion: sad I thought it was ok...

I know you want three slices. I'll give you some cake, but I'm not going to give you three slices though. I'll just give you one.

Is that really odd? I know redundancy is not a good thing if you want to have a good style, but it's not always unnatural, I think.
Thanks Emotion: smile

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using both would sound odd?
It sounds odd to me, too. I'm sure native speakers throw all sorts of words together in the "heat of conversation", but even when native speakers do it, it sounds odd.

CJ
Hmm, I see.
I just searched "my special corpus" for "but" and "though" used together. It looks like young people have no problems with that (they also say "But thanks though"). So I guess it's something that only some might find odd. Like "anyways"... I heard people use it all the time, and never heard them say "anyway".

Anyways... thanks Emotion: smile
Hi Kooyeen

I agree with CJ that all kinds of things can come out of people's mouths in the 'heat' of conversation, but my vote is to avoid intentionally using those two words together in the same sentence/clause. (Maybe you could just save it for occasional informal use in the sentence "But thanks though.") Emotion: indifferent
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Hi Amy,
long time no see Emotion: wink

Ok, I'll "try" to avoid using both "intentionally". The key words are "try" and "intentionally". Hmm. Emotion: stick out tongue

And thank you for giving your opinion too.