+1
Hi,
Could you please explain the subtle difference in meaning between but and yet in the sentences below? Can I use 'yet' in all the sentences here?

1.He is a doctor, but/yet he is not kind.

2.My mother is old, but/yet she is not rusty.

3.He is poor, but/yet he is happy.

4.She is Naughty, but/yet she is not happy.

5.Is Mike tall?
Yes, he is tall, but/yet he is thin.

6.It is a fat dog, but/yet its master is thin.

7.Is Linda a kind girl?
No, she is not a kind girl, but/yet she is a smart girl.

8.Is it a black knife?
No, it is not black, but/yet it is rusty.

Thanks.
Comments  
You use but to introduce something which contrasts with what you have just said. You use yet to introduce a fact which is rather surprising after the previous fact you have just mentioned. It is also to be noted that though both these words carry almost the same meaning, yet is a little more formal than but. Read the above sentences once more and decide which are surprising ones where yet can be used.

O.Abootty
Hi O.Abootty,

Thank you for your comment. The online dictionary says:

but

used to connect two statements or phrases when the second one adds something different or seems surprising after the first one.

So, what is their subtle difference if there is any?
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Can we use 'yet' in informal cases like the examples above or it can be used only in formal situations?

Thanks a lot.
Hi,

Could anyone please help me with my questions here?

1.
AnonymousCan we use 'yet' in informal cases like the examples above or it can be used only in formal situations?
2.but:

used to connect two statements or phrases when the second one adds something different or seems surprising after the first one.

So, what is their subtle difference if there is any?

Thank you very much.
Hi,
Could you please explain the subtle difference in meaning between but and yet in the sentences below? Can I use 'yet' in all the sentences here?

1.He is a doctor, but/yet he is not kind.

2.My mother is old, but/yet she is not rusty.

3.He is poor, but/yet he is happy.

4.She is Naughty, but/yet she is not happy.

5.Is Mike tall?
Yes, he is tall, but/yet he is thin.(and)

6.It is a fat dog, but/yet its master is thin.

7.Is Linda a kind girl?
No, she is not a kind girl, but/yet she is a smart girl.

8.Is it a black knife?
No, it is not black, but/yet it is rusty.

Thanks.
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There is no difference, despite what you were incorrectly told in the previous answer. "But" and "yet" are fully interchangeable, with no subtle differences, when used as conjunctions. They are often substituted for each other to avoid repetition.

Example: I really wanted to go to the movies, but I told you I wasn't going. Yet I went anyway.
Example: I really wanted to go to the movies, yet I told you I wasn't going. But I went anyway.

Both of the above sentences mean exactly the same thing.

"But" and "yet" are also used as adverbs. They are not interchangeable as adverbs. "Yet" as an adverb means "up to now," and "but" as an adverb means "only."

Example: I haven't yet finished my term paper. [meaning "I haven't finished my term paper up to now."]
Example: I have but one term paper left to finish. [meaning "I have only one term paper left to finish."]
Thanks for your wisdom explanation.