Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this sentence, "We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!"
So, just what are bacon butties?
At, http://tinyurl.com/2c2u5 or
http://icnewcastle.icnetwork.co.uk/sundaysun/news/tm objectid=142882&method=full&siteid=50081&headline=shell-shocked name page.html May 30 2004
By Caroline Smith, Sunday Sun
A North man was in shell shock yesterday after bomb disposal experts were called out to deal with what he thought was an unusual paperweight.
The object had been gathering dust on Phil Cullen's bookshelf for years until explosives experts removed it, fearing it could be a live device.
Phil, 37, alerted the Army yesterday after reading about a similar-looking object which turned out to be a fuse for a Second World War mortar shell.
And experts from the Royal Logistic Corps, based at Catterick Garrison, North Yorkshire, revealed they had examined a device identical to Phil's just hours earlier at a house in Stanley in County Durham.
They also carried out a controlled detonation of a bomb on Thursday which had been stored in a garage in Hartlepool for over 20 years.

"My uncle Jimmy was in the Air Force and I think he brought it back from Aden or Suez in the 1950s.
"It was always knocking round at my mum's and I have had it in my house for 12 years. I used it as a paperweight.
"It has what looks like Arabic writing on the side and there is a ticking sound if you turn it upside down.
"I thought it might be some kind of anti-aircraft device. I saw the story about the live bomb and it looked exactly the same as the one I had.
"I thought I better get it checked out in case it turned out to have the same explosive potential."
Staff Sergeant Paul Sargent took the fuse away for disposal.

"I hadn't seen one of these in 23 years and yet it is the second one I have seen this morning.
"We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!

"It is possible that it is a live fuse, but without taking it away for examination I can't tell whether it has a top detonator or not.

"There would be quite a pop if it was functioning so we will take it away for safety."

Al in Dallas
 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 12
Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this sentence, "We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!" So, just what are bacon butties?

It's just another name for a sarnie. Chip butties are very popular here in the North.
DC
Al in Dallas typed thus:
Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this sentence, "We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!" So, just what are bacon butties?

buttie = sandwich
"bacon", BTW is not the dreadful stuff served in US hotels for breakfast, which is sweet cured streaky bacon, cut too thin and fried too fattily. We do eat streaky bacon, but it's more common to eat back bacon, and it's always cut much thicker.
There is a type of police car nicknamed the Jam Buttie Car - see if you can tell why:

Ken Dodd, a Liverpudlian comedian, has an entire world based around his home in Knotty Ash, Liverpool (that bit's real) and inhabited by Diddymen, of which one part is the Jam Buttie Mine from which the Jam Butties are dug up.

David
==
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Al in Dallas typed thus:

Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this ... call to come here!" So, just what are bacon butties?

buttie = sandwich "bacon", BTW is not the dreadful stuff served in US hotels for breakfast, which is sweet cured ... inhabited by Diddymen, of which one part is the Jam Buttie Mine from which the Jam Butties are dug up.

"Diddies" are a term for the female breasts for some of the Irish.
Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this sentence, "We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!" So, just what are bacon butties?

(Snip)
The singular sandwich is usually spelt "butty", even in N. England.

But in answer to the OP's subject line ... not all butties are edible.

COED tells us that one's "butty" can also mean one's "mate or companion, or a middleman negotiating between a mine-owner and the miners" (butty is used by Welsh miners when talking about their shift-mates, to my knowledge). It's also a barge or other craft towed by another. Finally, there's "butty-gang a gang of men contracted to work on a large job and sharing the profits equally which it suggests may be from "Booty" as in "play booty" or share in the plunder.
(It's a quiet evening.)
Cheers, Sage
Al in Dallas typed thus: buttie = sandwich "bacon", BTW ... Buttie Mine from which the Jam Butties are dug up.

"Diddies" are a term for the female breasts for some of the Irish.

Also a term for penis.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Among the seemingly excessive number of paragraph breaks, there's this sentence, "We'd just been to Stanley to look at the other one, were tucking into our bacon butties and then we got the call to come here!" So, just what are bacon butties?

Buttered rolls with bacon.
Pronounced "byeakin boeties"
The "u" in "butties" rhymes with the "u" in "sugar".

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
"Diddies" are a term for the female breasts for some of the Irish.

Is that where thet pronounciation of "t" as "d" in some American dialects comes from, pronouncing "water" as "wahdr", for example?

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
"Diddies" are a term for the female breasts for some of the Irish.

Is that where thet pronounciation of "t" as "d" in some American dialects comes from, pronouncing "water" as "wahdr", for example?

I wouldn't think so. The Irish do well with "t"s. It's the following "h" that eludes them in certain words. You hear "t'ings" and "t'anks". They'd drive Franke nuts with their "T'anks for all o' that and God Bless" at the slightest indication of kindness.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Show more