+0
Chloe: OK, I just--I have this horrible nightmare that you are going to
rush to the bus station after Whitney leaves and profess (confess her?)your undying
love for Lana, and I'm going to be waiting at the gym all alone, and if
you do that to me Clark, I will never speak to you again, OK? I said it.

Clark: Chloe.

Clark: I'm going to the dance with you,
not by default, (because he has to?) but because I want to.
Comments  
I objected to "confess," because it implies some kind of guilt; but it's certainly possible, if that's what you mean. I had a block, so I cheated and grabbed a thesaurus - something I don't usually do, because I'm trying hard to keep my brain working. Here are some of the options I chose: Affirm, assert, state, declare, swear, acknowledge, represent, pronounce - take your pick. (I emboldened mine.)

like the default settings on your computer, you may choose something else, but if you don't choose, this is what you get. Clark is the normal, logical person whom she's "supposed" to dance with.
Got it. He says to her I'm going to the dance with you not because I have to but because I want to.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Right. Sorry, I got my characters swapped.
Thanks, Avangi!
Just one more question.
Chloe: OK, I just--I have this horrible nightmare

(She's really dreaming it or she has this terrible feeling?) that you are going to
rush to the bus station after Whitney leaves and profess your undying
love for Lana, and I'm going to be waiting at the gym all alone, and if
you do that to me Clark, I will never speak to you again, OK? I said it.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Probably a feeling. With that tense (I have), it either means I have it now (a feeling), or I have it on a recurring basis (nightmare). If the business about the bus station and the gym is a daily routine, then it could be a recurring nightmare. If it's a one-time thing, she's probably talking about a feeling.