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Hi

a) By that time tomorrow I will have left (I know this one is OK)
b) By that time tomorrow, I will have been gone (I know it's wrong because I should get rid of "been")
c) By that time tomorrow, I won't have been here (I know it's wrong, but this time I dunno why this is wrong. I do not think I should leave out "been"?)

Thanks
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Comments  
a) By that time tomorrow I will have left (I know this one is OK) Yes. OK.

b) By that time tomorrow, I will have been gone (I know it's wrong because I should get rid of "been") Yes. will have [gone / gone away / left] (already)

c) By that time tomorrow, I won't have been here (I know it's wrong, but this time I dunno why this is wrong. I do not think I should leave out "been"?) Just add yet.

By that time tomorrow, I won't have [been / arrived / visited you / seen you / met you] here yet.
In these the contrasting expressions already and not yet are often included.
CJ
Hi Calif

Someone else has told me that the last one: "is wrong. We’re talking about tomorrow (future) but in this context “have been” suggests the past - You could say:
“By that time tomorrow, I won’t be here” (in other words I will already have gone/have left)"

Do you agree with such an interpretation?
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Newguesthas told me that the last one: "is wrong. ... Do you agree ...?
Obviously not! I'm taking been to mean "arrived, done my business, and (possibly) left".
Suppose I come here daily at various times of day to deliver bottled water (or whatever). My customer asks if he can talk to me about the delivery arrangements the next time I come by -- say, at 1:30 pm tomorrow. (He is mistaken about when I am supposed to come by tomorrow.) I check my schedule and realize that I won't be making the delivery to that customer until 4 pm tomorrow. So I tell the customer:

By that time (1:30) tomorrow, I won't have been here yet. (I won't have arrived here to deliver the water yet.) We'll have to reschedule for 4 pm.
It makes perfect sense to me. I don't know why you were told it was wrong.
CJ
Hi

However: “By that time tomorrow, I won’t be here" is correct, isn't it?

Thanks
Newguest“By that time tomorrow, I won’t be here" is correct, isn't it?
Yes, but with a different meaning. It means that I will have already gone away from here before that time tomorrow.
CJ
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CalifJim
Newguest“By that time tomorrow, I won’t be here" is correct, isn't it?
Yes, but with a different meaning. It means that I will have already gone away from here before that time tomorrow.

CJ

How about: By that time tomorrow, I will have gone (from here).

Does it mean the same as: "I won't be here"?

Thanks

I won't be here predicts absence from a particular place. It doesn't say explicitly why. At least two different scenarios can be inferred: 1. I won't be here because I will not yet have arrived. I will still be about to arrive. Or: 2. I won't be here because I will already have left after being here.
I will have gone (from here) can only mean the second of the two.
In that way, I won't be here does not mean exactly the same thing as I will have gone even though they are very similar.

CJ
Hi,
b) By that time tomorrow, I will have been gone (I know it's wrong because I should get rid of "been")

However, note that you could say By that time tomorrow, I will have been gone for two hours. (ie I left two hours earlier)

Best wishes, Clive
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