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1. Suppose I go to a hotel in the morning and book a room for that night, and then, I come back in the afternoon to check in. The receptionist asks me how I booked (whether online or through phone). Which of the following should I say to her?

A. I came here this morning and personally booked a room.
B. I went here this morning and personally booked a room.

2. If both are OK, what is the difference between came and went in the example?
3. Can I also say "and booked a room in person" instead of "and personally booked a room"? Do they mean the same? Which is more natural?
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When you have "here" or "there" in a sentence, it's easy. It's always come/came here and go/went there.

You booked the room in person -- you were actually standing there at the time, instead of doing it by phone or email.
You personally booked the room -- no one else did it for you.
Thank you very much for your explanation especially the tip for "come here" and "go there".
khoffYou booked the room in person -- you were actually standing there at the time, instead of doing it by phone or email.
You personally booked the room -- no one else did it for you.
In my example, which is appropriate: personally or in person?

Another example, if I may ask, which of the following is correct?
C. Can I go with her to the fitting room to see if the dress looks good on her?
D. Can I come with her to the fitting room to see if the dress lookds good on her?

If both are OK, what is the difference between go and come in the example above? Please help.
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Several days ago, I peeked on a book in a library about the common misuse of words and phrases. I've read this one:

You have to go here.

which is, according to the book, incorrect.

I've search on the Internet, and this is what I've learned: It depends on the location of the one you're talking to.

If you're talking to someone to come on your location, use come.

Please come here.

If you're talking to someone to go on other location, use go.

Please go and give this to her.

In you're case, since you and listener is talking about your current location, I came here... is correct, regardless when it happened.

2. Either way is correct, but personally booked the room or booked the room personally sounds better, for me.
AnonymousIn my example, which is appropriate: personally or in person?

Another example, if I may ask, which of the following is correct?

C. Can I go with her to the fitting room to see if the dress looks good on her?

D. Can I come with her to the fitting room to see if the dress lookds good on her?

If both are OK, what is the difference between go and come in the example above? Please help.

Using with means you and the girl will go together to a fitting room.

As what I've said above, you and the girl will go to another destination, so use go.

But if you're going to visit the fitting room is where the girl at, use come.

Thank you, de guzman. I appreciate it.
de guzmanBut if you're going to visit the fitting room is where the girl at, use come.
I was probably talking to the sales lady in this example. Don't you think 'go' is still the one appropriate here because the fitting room I'm visiting, where the girl is at, is a location other than my and the sales lady's current location at the moment of speaking?
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Since the receptionist asked how you booked the room (rather than something like "Was the reservation made by a travel agent?), I would say "I booked the room in person is the better answer.

As far as the dressing room question, I would say that "go" is the better choice. However, I would add that some cases (where you don't have either "here" or "there" in the sentence) the difference is not terribly important. "Can I come with her to the dressing room?" does not sound as obviously wrong as, for instance, "Can I come there after work and meet you?"
AnonymousC. Can I go with her to the fitting room to see if the dress looks good on her?
D. Can I come with her to the fitting room to see if the dress lookds good on her?
You go to (into) places. You come from (out of) places. Use C.

Note the contrast: I came out of the fitting room with her.

CJ
AnonymousThank you, de guzman. I appreciate it.
de guzmanBut if you're going to visit the fitting room is where the girl at, use come.
I was probably talking to the sales lady in this example. Don't you think 'go' is still the one appropriate here because the fitting room I'm visiting, where the girl is at, is a location other than my and the sales lady's current location at the moment of speaking?
WHOA. I was confused. Okay well, whether you're going to the fitting room with the girl or not, for as long as you're talking to the sales lady away from the fitting room, then use go. unless the sales lady was inside the fitting room.

whoa, i think I've got an headache with the uses of come and go. hahaha. But i'ts ok. I've learned a lot. Emotion: smile
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