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Except the word "enough", are there other adverbs that can postmodify an adjective or another adverb?

1. The shop is open late.

Q1) Is sentence 1 above correct English?

Q2) In sentence 1 above, does the adverb "late" postmodify the adjective "open"?

Q3) If so, could you make an example where an adverb postmodifies another adverb?

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The sentence is unremarkable. The adverb of time just is placed at the end of the sentence.

The shop is open.
The shop is open now.
The shop is open from 8 am to 9 pm.
The shop is open seven days a week.
The shop is open 24 hours a day.
The shop is open whenever I drive by.

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fire1adverbs that can postmodify an adjective or another adverb?

I don't have the answer to that question, but note that it's highly unlikely if the adjective is used attributively (*an open late shop). Even enough can't do that (*a full enough glass).

CJ

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AlpheccaStars

The sentence is unremarkable. The adverb of time just is placed at the end of the sentence.

The shop is open.
The shop is open now.
The shop is open from 8 am to 9 pm.
The shop is open seven days a week.
The shop is open 24 hours a day.
The shop is open whenever I drive by.

Then can I think of "now", "seven days a week", and "whenever I drive by" as postmodifying the adjective "open"?

If not, are there natural examples where an adverb or adverbial phrase postmodifies an adjective or another adverb?

Thank you very much

fire1as postmodifying the adjective "open"?

No. I have never seen such a grammatical analysis, but that does not mean that there isn't a grammarian in the world who's concocted such a relationship.


Adverbs can modify adjectives, but not in the post-position. It is a manner of degree, for example "very" in your sentence.

It is open very late.

Infinitives can complement adjectives. They follow the adjective.

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.