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I know that rapidly is a more common adverb to use with finance and currency.

e.g. European dollar has fallen rapidly.


I was asked if "obviously" can be used, in addition to rapidly, in order to tell that the currency has dropped very fast in short time so that many people become aware of it. e.g. EUR has fallen obviously.


I'm not quite sure, so I ask here. Is it okay?

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kenny1999I was asked if "obviously" can be used, in addition to rapidly, in order to tell that the currency has dropped very fast in a short time

No. 'rapidly' and 'obviously' have two different meanings.

Just because you can see something very plainly and easily (obviously) does not mean that it's moving fast (rapidly). It might be obvious that a snail is moving, but snails never move rapidly.

CJ

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Well my first language does really have a lot of differences with English. It's very hard to directly translate from one language to another. After learning English for 30 years which includes an intensive 20 years, I still have hard time making a decision on an appropriate word to use when I want to express something.

by the way, why "in a short time" rather than "in short time". I strongly believe that "time" isn't countable.

kenny1999

by the way, why "in a short time" rather than "in short time". I strongly believe that "time" isn't countable.

The abstract concept of time is uncountable, but we use the word "time" in a lot of different ways. Only the first sentence below uses "time" as an uncountable noun.

"Time and tide wait for no man." (time in the abstract)
We've been waiting here for a long time. (period of time)
I've been to New York three times. (occasions)

CJ

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kenny1999European dollar

This doesn't make sense. You could instead write the Euro https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Euro