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Can a dependent or subordinate clause be a sentence?

I think it can be because it can have both subject and verb.
Comments  
Hi Jackson

Dependent or subordinate clauses are introduced by relative pronouns or subordinating conjunctions, and that is primarily what makes the thought (sentence) incomplete.

For example, "Although I go to the dentist regularly" and "that Jack built" are not a complete thoughts. You need the rest of each sentence in order for those clauses to make sense.

Hi Amy,

That means a sentence must have a subject, a verb, and a complete thought to be a sentence. Right?

Best wishes, Jackson
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Hi Jackson

Generally speaking, the two basic necessities of a sentence are a subject and a verb. Sometimes, however, the subject is understood (in imperative sentences, for example). In my opinion, the presence of a subject and verb should not be the only considerations. A sentence should make sense and express a complete thought as well.

If you remove the word 'although' from the example in my first post, you will have a complete thought and a complete sentence:
I go to the dentist regularly.

Does that answer your question adequately?
Jackson6612That means a sentence must have a subject, a verb, and a complete thought to be a sentence. Right?
What if I just cried out "Help!!!"... it would be a sentence, wouldn't it? Emotion: smile
YankeeDoes that answer your question adequately?

Hi Amy,

Yes, it does answer my question. Thanks a lot for helping me.

Kind regards, Jackson
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Help would be an imperative sentence. The implied subject is "You."