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I wrote :

Introducing a new computer product or process by a year earlier can give a company a significant edge on its competitors.

I have been told that this is wrong and the following is correct :

To introduce a new computer product or process by a year earlier can give a company a significant edge on its competitors.

Can someone explain what is wrong with my sentence ?

Thanks in advance.
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Comments  
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There is something wrong, but it has little to do with introducing and to introduce. to introduce is not very good; I wouldn't recommend that wording.

Introducing a new computer product or process a year earlier than its competitor can give a company a significant edge.

Advancing the introduction of a new computer product or process by a year can give a company a significant edge over its competitors.


CJ
CalifJimIntroducing a new computer product or process a year earlier than its competitor can give a company a significant edge.

CaliJim,

why the word 'competitor' is not plural?

Thank you
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Because I copied it wrong from the original sentence.

CJ
I appreciate your respose sir; however, this is from a standardized sentence correction test and "to introduced ..." was the official answer. I couldn't justify how it better than the other one.
Both the gerund and the infinitive can be used as the subject of a clause although the gerund is more common:

Seeing the sun rise on a summer morning is an unforgettable experience.
To see the sun rise on a summer morning is an unforgettable experience.

Perhaps even more often people say:
It's an unforgettable experience to see the sun rise on a summer morning.

Cheers
CB
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Titas I appreciate your respose sir; however, this is from a standardized sentence correction test and "to introduced ..." was the official answer. I couldn't justify how it better than the other one.
Then the test writers are incorrect. We never say "to introduced".
It fine as it is.
I think the examiners wanted to see if the students draw a line between the gerund and the infinitive, like in 'Try to use the key' vs 'Try using the key' or 'Nice to see you' vs 'Nice seeing you'.

You will say 'It is nice to see you' and 'It was nice seeing you', won't you?
Cool BreezeSeeing the sun rise on a summer morning is an unforgettable experience.
To see the sun rise on a summer morning is an unforgettable experience.
These examples render different meanings. You would say 'Seeing...' when you had or have had the experience, while 'To see...' when you anticipate the experience itself or sharing it with your friends.

As for the original sentence, I don't think the context, being of rather abstract nature, has any connection with any particular situation, hence both the infinitive and the gerund can be used.

I would say: 'Introducing a new computer a year ahead of the competitors...'
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