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I saw a sentence in my grammar book. It says: I'm going to wait until John has finished his coffee.

Can it be rephrased in this way: "I'm going to wait until John finishes his coffee."

There are two sentences similar to this one, like: "I'm going to Rome when I have finished my Italian lessons.", "Let's welcome him when he comes home."

Can these two sentences be rephrased as "I'm going to Rome when I finish my Italian lessons." and "Let's welcome him when he has come home."

Please! Please tell me what's the difference between those 2 sentences,and I would deeply appreciate it, because I've been very confused about it for some time.Emotion: big smile
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These are my thoughts.

I'm going to wait until John has finished his coffee. Correct

I'm going to wait until John finishes his coffee. Correct

I am going to Rome after finishing my Italian lessons./I will go to Rome when I finish my Italian lessons.

Let's welcome him when he comes/reaches home.
ViceidolI saw a sentence in my grammar book. It says: I'm going to wait until John has finished his coffee.

Can it be rephrased in this way: "I'm going to wait until John finishes his coffee." Yes

There are two sentences similar to this one, like: "I'm going to Rome when I have finished my Italian lessons.", "Let's welcome him when he comes home."

Can these two sentences be rephrased as "I'm going to Rome when I finish my Italian lessons." and "Let's welcome him when he has come home."
I would describe the difference this way:

"I'm going to Rome when I have finished my Italian lessons." = I'm going to Rome at a time which is after the completion of my Italian lessons. It's unclear how long after, but the suggestion is that it will not be too long afterwards -- perhaps a week or several weeks afterwards.

"I'm going to Rome when I finish my Italian lessons." = I'm going to Rome as soon as I finish my Italian lesson. In other words, this sentence suggests that 'finish' and 'go' are practically simultaneous.

"Let's welcome him when he comes home." = Let's welcome him at the moment he arrives home.

"Let's welcome him when he has come home."?= Let's welcome him soon after his arrival. In other words, the welcome might happen a day or several days (perhaps even longer) after his arrival rather than at the time he arrives.
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Thanks! The best answer I've heard!!
Hey there, can I ask a related question?
Are the following both possible and ok? I like the second, but I wonder if the first is just as good. It is that "when you finish" that bothers me... because you do something after you finish, not when you finish... hmmm.

Tell me what you found when you finish searching, ok?
Tell me what you found when you have finished searching, ok?


thanks Emotion: smile
Think of "when" in this sense as "upon this happening."

Tell me about your day when you finish cleaning that fish. (Because I can't be in the room with you while you do that.)

I will bake you some cookies when I finish the dishes from dinner.
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Hi Kooyeen

Both of those sentences are fine. In both cases, it is clear that tell will follow finish. Consider the use with the simple past tense:

He left when I arrived
. = First I arrived, then he left. (The sentence suggests that "he left immediately on my arrival".)

EDIT:
Hi Barb. Emotion: smile I didn't see your post before I posted.
Ok, thanks. I think it's the verb "finish" that allows that. That is, "when you finish" = "after you finish", but "when you check your mail" is not equal to "after you check you mail".

Tell me what she told you when you've checked your mail.
Tell me what she told you when you check your mail.

Those two are not the same. Ok then, thanks again for *clearing my weird doubts. Emotion: wink

*edit: that expression must be Italian-English, looks like it's not correct.
Hi Kooyeen

You're right that the meaning of a verb also plays a role:

In this sentence, it would be better to use 'after' (rather than 'when'):
Tell me what she told you after you check your mail.
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