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Despite changes in race relations, racism is still a problem in 2010, and 15 percent of United States citizens are stereotyped based on their race.

Since the beginning of the 19th century, racism has been a problem. In the late 1900's people of the United States were judged and even killed simply because of the color of their skin. Different ethnicities were not allowed in the same schools, restaurants, or even restroom. African Americans and poor Whites were not classified as citizens of the U.S. They were not allowed to vote and African-Americans were forced into slavery. Chinese and other immigrants were forced to do cheap labor and blamed by the U.S for the lack of jobs and bringing drugs into the United States. Eventually, Congress passed laws allowing immigrants to come into the U.S.

Racism has improved since those days through education and voices of leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, and Rosa Parks. Today, everyone has equal rights but many problems still occur.

Racial Stereotypes are a big problem in the United States. A common racial stereotype is that all African-American steal. I was a victim of this stereotype. Last year, while attending Louisiana State University at Eunice, I joined a campus organization called "Campus Activity Board." One of my co-workers money was stolen and I was blamed because I was the only African-American worker.

"It made me feel sad and depressed because I knew I did not do it, but I could not prove that I did not do it either, so I found guilty by my co-workers because I was black and they associate African-Americans with crime. It is something that I will never forget for the rest of my life." Daniel said.

Some think that African American males are poor, illiterate, ignorant, dangerous, thieves, athletic, lazy, and loud, refer to their girlfriend or spouse as their "baby mama", wear braids, and of course listen to rap music. These characteristics are not representative of all African American men.

John Bennette a junior at Louisiana State University at Eunice was pulled over by a LSUE staff member asking him for identification before he could enter the on campus apartments mainly because he was listing to his rap CD loud, and had his hair braided.

"I felt that I was stopped and questioned because the LSUE staff member thought I looked dangerous and was going to steal others property." Bennette said.

Stereotypes are not just common against African Americans, but White-Americans and other ethnicities as well. The most common racial stereotype against White-Americans is that they cannot dance and do not have any coordination because they are not African- American or Native- American.

Lydia Trevino a senior in high school was told that she could not join her high school's dance team by the African-American captain because she did not "look like she could dance."

"It was very discouraging because I have been dancing since I was four, but I was told that I could not dance because I am a skinny white girl." Lydia said.

There are also racial stereotypes against Mexican-Americans. One of the stereotypes is that Mexican-Americans are not smart, and that all of their last names are Maria or Gabriela.

Jeanette Campos, a senior at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge while working at a local grocery story was constantly asked by customers "What are you?" One customer even told her that she was surprised to see someone of "her kind" with the name Jeanette and that it was unusual.

"I'm sorry, I was unaware that names had racial identities or that certain names were limited to certain races." Jeanette said to the customer.

Many people were unaware that racial stereotypes existed. According to a study done by American Statistics Association, three out of every 20 Americans have experience a racial stereotype in their life. Will we ever live in a world where people will not stereotype you based on your race? The question that I have is: what is the best way to deal with this? Some say just ignore it but dealing with racial stereotypes can hurt mentally and physically.
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Despite changes in race relations, racism is still a problem in 2010, and 15 percent of United States citizens are stereotyped based on their race.

Since the beginning of the 19th century, racism has been a problem. In the late 1900's people of the United States were judged and even killed simply because of the color of their skin.
People of different ethnicities were not allowed in the same schools, restaurants, or even restroom. African Americans and
poor Whites were not classified as citizens of the U.S. They were not allowed
to vote and African-Americans were forced into slavery. Chinese and other
immigrants were forced to do cheap labor and blamed by the U.S for the lack of jobs and bringing drugs into the United States. Eventually, Congress passed laws allowing immigrants to come into the U.S.
Racism has improved since those days through education and voices of leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, and Rosa Parks. Today, everyone has equal rights but many problems still occur.
Racial Stereotypes are a big problem in the United States. A common racial stereotype is that all African-American steal. I was a victim of this stereotype. Last year, while attending Louisiana State University at Eunice, I joined a campus organization called "Campus Activity Board." One of my co-workers money was stolen and I was blamed because I was the only African-American worker.
"It made me feel sad and depressed because I knew I did not do it, but I could not prove that I did not do it either, so I found guilty by my co-workers because I was black and they associate African-Americans with crime. It is something that I will never forget for the rest of my life." Daniel said.
Some think that African American males are poor, illiterate,
ignorant, dangerous, thieves, athletic, lazy, and loud, refer to their
girlfriend or spouse as their "baby mama", wear braids, and of course listen to rap music. These characteristics are not representative of all African American men.
John Bennette a junior at Louisiana State University at Eunice was pulled over by a LSUE staff member asking him for identification before he could enter the on campus apartments mainly because he was listing to
his rap CD loud, and had his hair braided.
"I felt that I was stopped and questioned because the LSUE
staff member thought I looked dangerous and was going to steal others
property." Bennette said.
Stereotypes are not just common against African Americans,
but White-Americans and other ethnicities as well. The most common racial
stereotype against White-Americans is that they cannot dance and do not have any coordination because they are not African- American or Native- American.
Lydia Trevino a senior in high school was told that she
could not join her high school's dance team by the African-American captain
because she did not "look like she could dance."
"It was very discouraging because I have been dancing since
I was four, but I was told that I could not dance because I am a skinny white girl." Lydia said.
There are also racial stereotypes against Mexican-Americans. One of the
stereotypes is
that Mexican-Americans are not smart, and that all of their last names are Maria or Gabriela.
Jeanette Campos, a senior at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge while working at a local grocery story was constantly asked by customers "What are you?" One customer even told her that she was surprised to see
someone of "her kind" with the name Jeanette and that it was unusual.
"I'm sorry, I was unaware that names had racial identities or that certain names were limited to certain races."
Jeanette said to the customer.
Many people were unaware that racial stereotypes existed. According to a study done by American Statistics Association, three out of every 20 Americans have experience a racial stereotype in their life. Will we ever live in a world where people will not stereotype you based on your race? The question that I have is: what is the best way to deal with this? Some say just ignore it but dealing with racial stereotypes can hurt mentally and physically.
Comments  
Despite changes in race relations, racism is still a problem in 2010, and 15 percent of United States citizens are stereotyped based on their race.

Since the beginning of the 19th century, racism has been a problem. In the late 1900's people of the United States were judged and even killed simply because of the color of their skin.
People of different ethnicities were not allowed in the same schools, restaurants, or even restrooms. African Americans, and poor Whites were not classified as citizens of the U.S. They were not allowed to vote and African-Americans were forced into slavery. Chinese and other
immigrants were forced to do cheap labor and blamed by the United States for the lack of jobs and bringing drugs into the United States. Eventually, Congress passed laws allowing immigrants to come into the U.S.Racism has improved since those days through education and voices of leaders like Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, and Rosa Parks. Today, everyone has equal rights but many problems still occur.

Racial Stereotypes are a big problem in the United States. A common racial stereotype is that all African-Americans steal. I was a victim of this stereotype. Last year, while attending Louisiana State University at Eunice, I joined a campus organization called "Campus Activity Board." One of my co-workers money was stolen and I was blamed because I was the only African-American worker.

"It made me feel sad and depressed because I knew I did not do it, but I could not prove that I did not do it either, so I was found guilty by my co-workers because I was black and they associate African-Americans with crime. It is something that I will never forget for the rest of my life." Daniel said.

Some think that African American males are poor, illiterate, ignorant, dangerous, thieves, athletic, lazy, and loud, refer to their girlfriend or spouse as their "baby mama", wear braids, and of course listen to rap music. These characteristics are not representative of all African American men.

John Bennette, a junior at Louisiana State University at Eunice, was pulled over by a LSUE staff member asking him for identification before he could enter the on campus apartments mainly because he was listing tohis rap CD loud, and had his hair braided.

"I felt that I was stopped and questioned because the LSUE staff member thought I looked dangerous and was going to steal others property." Bennette said.

Stereotypes are not just common against African Americans, but White-Americans and other ethnicities as well. The most common racial stereotype against White-Americans is that they cannot dance and do not have any coordination because they are not African- American or Native- American.

Lydia Trevino, a senior in high school, was told that she could not join her high school's dance team by the African-American captain because she did not "look like she could dance."

"It was very discouraging because I have been dancing since I was four, but I was told that I could not dance because I am a skinny white girl." Lydia said.

There are also racial stereotypes against Mexican-Americans. One of the
stereotypes is that Mexican-Americans are not smart, and that all of their last names are Maria or Gabriela.

Jeanette Campos, a senior at Louisiana State University, while working at a local grocery story was constantly asked by customers "What are you?" One customer even told her that she was surprised to see someone of "her kind" with the name Jeanette and that it was unusual.

"I'm sorry, I was unaware that names had racial identities or that certain names were limited to certain races."Jeanette said to the customer.

Many people were unaware that racial stereotypes existed. According to a study done by American Statistics Association, three out of every 20 Americans have experience a racial stereotype in their life. Will we ever live in a world where people will not stereotype you based on your race? The question that I have is: what is the best way to deal with this? Some say just ignore it but dealing with racial stereotypes can hurt mentally and physically.