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This abomination is rampaging through the United States (people intend it to mean "I'm ready to serve the next person in line") and it drives me crazy! I always want to say, "No, you can't help who's next, this is just the way we're lined up. There's nothing you can do about it." I think it should be "Can I help whoever's next," or - here's a daring thought - how about "Next, please." Am I being overly sensitive? Is there some way of seeing this as acceptable that I'm missing? Is it British? (In which case I certainly apologize for calling it an abomination, and will try to be more accepting!) Does it bother anyone else? Any comments?
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Comments  (Page 3) 
Hi,

I can irritate people a lot, sometimes. This thread is just a minor example of how irritating I can be.

Clive
Absolutely.

Could be we're here to find something right in what's obviously wrong - at least at the first sight - . A justification... We are "the Justifiers"!
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Am I alone in being irritated by people who over-analyse ...

It depends what you mean by "over-analyse"...

MrP
Hi,

Am I alone in being irritated by people who over-analyse ...

Easy one. 'Over-analyse' is what all you guys do. What I do is analyse in a manner that is both beneficial and fascinating, providing unique commentary couched in an engrossing style that combines erudition and insight with a becoming humility.

Clive

PS - As a wild guess, in lay terms I'd say

A macrosememe consists of a class of semantically related macrosemes which constitute a meaningful component of a structure having two or more sememes and at least one episememe. [...] Macrosememes are of two types: (1) 'linguimacrosememes', based upon the linguistic context and (2) 'ethnomacrosememes', based upon the nonlinguistic context.

Jeez, Khoff, you didn't know that?
linguimacrosememes -- I think I had this at an Italian restaurant recently.

Thanks, Clive, for putting it in lay terms for me!Emotion: wink
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Khoff
linguimacrosememes -- I think I had this at an Italian restaurant recently.

Thanks, Clive, for putting it in lay terms for me!Emotion: wink

I had a Big Macrosememe with fries last night.

MrP
Looking at the long definition of macrosememe above it seems that some linguistic definitions have moved on a bit since I read loads of books on linguistics many years ago. To me a macrosememe is a phrase that has to be taken as a whole, its meaning having no relation to the meanings of its separate parts. As for over analysis, I do not mind comedians doing it for fun as it can be amusing when someone points out what we are actually saying. But otherwise it is like when you are in a room and someone knocks on the door and you say "Who's that?" and the person with you says, "I don't know. How am I supposed to know? I'm not psychic."

While I am at it I am also irritated by people who say that decade should not be pronounced on its first syllable because it sounds the same as deck aid. As to which I say: (a) So what. Are you ever going to confuse a decade with a deck aid? (b) What is a deck aid? (c) There are hundreds of homophones in English. (d) They do not sound the same anyway. The two parts of deck aid are separated by the phenomenon of juncture; it is what distinguishes a blackbird from a black bird.

I feel better now!
Sorry if this discussion has been irritating people.

It's not really the analysis per se that is troublesome. The troublesome spots are value judgments that pass for analysis, as in the opening salvo:

This abomination
and, less subtly, in a response:
I just can't stand those who are too lazy to speak with some degree of intelligence
CJ
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This abomination


(sigh...) I was young and intemperate and had only been reading the forum for a couple of weeks when I wrote that, and now it has come back to haunt me!
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