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Hi everybody,

In “do you have difficulty getting up”, “difficulty” means when something is not easy TO DO or UNDERSTAND. It’s an uncount noun.

In “children with these difficulties may also substitute sounds in words”, “difficulty” means “problem”. It’s a count noun.

In “Children who have difficulties with oral language have difficulty remembering information and organizing information (comprehension)”, “have difficulties with oral language” means “have problems with oral language ”, and “have difficulty remembering” means “not easy to remenber.”

According to what I wrote earlier, the following sentence is not grammatically correct “Children can also have difficulty with social language skills or pragmatics”. It should rather be Children can also have A difficulty with social language skills or pragmatics”. Because here “difficulty” means “problem” (a count noun), and not "TO DO or UNDERSTAND. It’s an uncount noun." But I have never seen "I have a difficulty...".

Thank you for your coming explanations.
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Consider it done, sfb!

(You have to put a space on each side of the code.)

MrP