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Dear Teachers

Can I say these sentences(grammatical?):

"There has not been any problem happen to me." rather than these ("There has not been any problem that happens to me" and "There has not been any problem happening to me" and "There has not been any problem happened to me")

"There is a person say bad things about her." rather than these ("There is a person saying bad things about her" and "There is a person who says bad things about her)

I know the ones in the brackets are correct but I am just curious about "happen and "say"

One Extra Question Emotion: smile

What is the difference between "There has not been any problem happening to me" and "There has not been any problem happened to me" in meaning

Thanks Emotion: smile
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We usually say that we have problems, not that they happen to us. Accidents happen to us. We can also have accidents, misfortunes, difficulties.
Thanks . I know that

but what i want really to know are the answers to my questions above. (there are 2questions)
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Sorry, I answered all your questions but my post disappeared.
Anyway, I'm not going to write all those examples again, but the gist of it is that in the affirmative, you can explain a difference between present continuous and present perfect, but in the negative, when something doesn't happen, it doesn't make much difference if it doesn't happen continuously or if it hasn't happened at all.

The infinitive, to say, works with "do" for questions and other tenses. "What did they say about her?" "They did say bad things about her." "That person does say bad things about her."

"I / we / you / they say bad things about her all the time," is simple present. Unfortunately, third person singular switches to "says."
Ok but i want to know wheteher i can say like this or not

"There has not been any problem happen to me." rather than these ("There has not been any problem that happens to me" and "There has not been any problem happening to me" and "There has not been any problem happened to me")

"There is a person say bad things about her." rather than these ("There is a person saying bad things about her" and "There is a person who says bad things about her)

I know the ones in the brackets are correct but I am just curious whether the blue and underlined (blue bold verb) ones are correct (grmmatical) even in positive context
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None of your "happen" phrases may be said grammatically.

Substitute "I / we / they" for your blue "There is a person," and you may say, "I say bad things about her." "It is I / we / they who say bad things about her." "There are people who say bad things about her." (for "there is a person who says")
Dear Teachers

Is the heat acting as adjective in this context "There's only a slight heat increase on the bottom of the computer" ?

From my opinion it's adjective, because if it's an object (noun) here the incease would be "increasing" or "which is increasing" or "which increases"

So am I right about this

Thanks
Can I say these sentences(grammatical?):
"There has not been any problem happen to me." No. rather than these ("There has not been any problem that happens to me" No. and "There has not been any problem happening to me" No. and "There has not been any problem happened to me" No. )

The structure is not idiomatic at all. Let's change it a little and see if we can get to the point of what you're asking.

There's something strange happening to me. OK.

There's something strange happen to me. NO.

There's something strange happened to me. NO.

There's something strange that happens to me (when I watch TV for more than four hours). OK.

There's something strange that happened to me (yesterday). Borderline acceptable.

Something strange is happening to me. OK.

Something strange happened to me (yesterday). OK.

"There is a person say bad things about her." No. rather than these ("There is a person saying bad things about her" OK. and "There is a person who says bad things about her OK)
I know the ones in the brackets are correct but I am just curious about "happen and "say"

One Extra Question

What is the difference between "There has not been any problem happening to me" and "There has not been any problem happened to me" in meaning

I don't get enough meaning from these to make any kind of judgment, so I don't think I can answer in a way that addresses your question. Maybe my examples above have already answered your question.


CJ
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