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1. To be correct, the sentence needs the word.


2. In order to be correct, the sentence needs the word.

Q1) Are sentences 1 and 2 above all correct English?


Q2) As for 1 and 2, does "to be correct" describe "the sentence"?


Q3) Are sentences 1 and 2 really correct even though "to be correct" and "in order to be correct" are used for the subject that is not a human?

You know "the sentence" cannot have a purpose, so isn't it wrong to say "To be correct" and "In order to be correct" to describe "the sentence"? If that is possible, could you make some examples where the similar structure is used?

Q4) Do sentences 1 and 2 mean the same as "The sentence needs the word so as to be correct" and "The sentence needs the word so that the sentence can be correct "?

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