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Can "I have got you" and "You have got me" mean the same thing as "I've understood you" and "You've understood me" according to context?

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I think you've already asked this. How many times was it? Twice? Three times?

Didn't you get an answer? I thought you did.

CJ

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fire1Can "I have got you" and "You have got me" mean the same thing as "I've understood you" and "You've understood me" according to context?

There is a very small chance that "got" can be "understood" in that sentence, but it's not the first thing I'd think of.

I'd think of it as "I've got you to help me if no one else can" or something like that.

— What will I do if I get a terrible disease? I have no one who can take care of me.
— You've got me.

CJ

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Comments  

To CalifJim

Yep.. I need your help CalifJim

I want to hear your opinion on this.

I'm still confused now. this will be my last question of this topic.

I seem to need to make up a context to get a good answer on it.

So, let's say I'm chatting with my girlfriend and she says I don't get what you're talking about, because you're speaking so fast, and I say slowly, and I ask her "have you got me"? and she says "Yes, I have got you".

In this situation, isn't it possible to say "I have got you" to mean "I've understood you"?


I have no idea why native speakers give different views on it.

Someone says it's possible, but someone else says it's not possible...

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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To CalifJim

Thank you very much for your help, and I'm very sorry CalifJim.

I just edited my question and added some context I made. Could you re-read my question?

I'm so sorry.

fire1So, let's say I'm chatting with my girlfriend and she says I don't get what you're talking about, because you're speaking so fast, and I say slowly, and I ask her "have you got me"? and she says "Yes, I have got you".In this situation, isn't it possible to say "I have got you" to mean "I've understood you"?

People can understand each other speaking that way, but it's not what native speakers say.

We ask "Got it?" And the answer is "Got it."

That's because what you get (receive) is the message (it), not the other person (you).

CJ

CalifJim

People can understand each other speaking that way, but it's not what native speakers say.

CJ

Q1) Is the reason people wouldn't say "You have got you" that this can be interpreted different ways?


Q2) If Q1 is right, are"I got you" and "I get you" not preferred to "I got it" and "I get it" in the situation?

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fire1Q1) Is the reason people wouldn't say "You have got you" that this can be interpreted different ways?

I think you mean one of these:

I have got you. / You have got me.


There are hundreds of expressions with "got" and they're all pretty idiosyncratic, and each one means something a little different. And many of them have more than one meaning.

The only common one that translates to "I understand you" is "Gotcha!" which is a highly abbreviated form of I have got you. If you use the full form, nobody will have the slightest idea what you're talking about. And the abbreviated form is only used in the most casual settings.

fire1Q2) If Q1 is right, are"I got you" and "I get you" not preferred to "I got it" and "I get it" in the situation?

"it" is preferred. "you" is not preferred.

CJ