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I had a squabble with my GF over this. The other day at lunch, she asked if, having eaten, I felt better then I did prior to eating. I said, "Yes and I will feel more better after digesting and resting." She said "more better" was ALWAYS wrong, and I argued that in this case it was correct because it actually was what I was trying to say, with "more" modifying "better", as opposed to the common incorrect usage where "more better" is used as a phrase modifying a noun, as in, "Ice cream is more better than ice." Am I wrong or was my usage correct? (I know it would have been preferable to say "even better" or "better still" or something, but I am curious how people respond to this one. Thanks!

=David
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"more better" is not correct.

I'll feel even better after...

Or After I..., I'll feel better yet.
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Hi,
I once read something about "more better" or something like that. I remember reading that it is used, it's not "incorrect", descriptively speaking. That is, some native speakers in some situations actually use structures like "more better". It is obviously not accepted in formal English and probably in many varieties of English, but...
I'll try to find out someting about that on the net Emotion: smile
Not correct, IMO, but they can be seen accidentally joined in sentences as this one by the director of the BBC:

-------
The aim was to try to, I mean I started off trying to say look what we
needed was more better programming, we've, that takes a number of
factors.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/breakfast_with_frost/1152949.stm
-------

where he probably wanted to say:

was more of the better programming
More and better are both comparatives. It's impossible - even in English with all its wild exceptions - to have a comparative like more qualify another comparative, better.

CB
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KooyeenHi,
I once read something about "more better" or something like that. I remember reading that it is used, it's not "incorrect", descriptively speaking. That is, some native speakers in some situations actually use structures like "more better". It is obviously not accepted in formal English and probably in many varieties of English, but...
I'll try to find out someting about that on the net Emotion: smile

Hi Kooyeen

Don't go overboard with your descriptiveness. Emotion: wink "More better" (as a comparative) is frowned on even in informal English.

I agree with many of the things that the descriptive "grammarians" write, but I also think that when you get to the point where you accept and embrace any old thing that has ever been uttered, you've gone way too far.
Marius HancuThe aim was to try to, I mean I started off trying to say look what we
needed was more better programming, we've, that takes a number of
factors.
Marius, that is the incoherent ramblings of a man on a chatshow that keeps changing direction mid-sentence. Nevertheless, with a hyphen added it does seem to make some sense: "What we need is more better-programming."
I understand and agree, at this point I am really just playing devil's advocate. If "even better" is fine, why is "more better" wrong in this case? "even" and "more" mean exactly the same thing in this construction and are begin used exactly the same way - as in "I fell 10% better now and I will feel 20% better later." I understand about a double comparitive, but I also think it is the meaning that matters, not the letter of the law. Murder is illegal, but each case has to be considered on its own. What if it was self defense? I am sure you see what I am saying, and again I understand why it would be considered wrong, I just think it is an interesting think to think about. Maybe it is not as cut and dried as it seems at first. Thanks everyone!

=David
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YankeeDon't go overboard with your descriptiveness. Emotion: wink "More better" (as a comparative) is frowned on even in informal English.

I agree with many of the things that the descriptive "grammarians" write, but I also think that when you get to the point where you accept and embrace any old thing that has ever been uttered, you've gone way too far.

Hi Amy,
I really read something interesting about that, but I don't remember where. I'll try to search again... It is obvious that "more better" is very low register and not the best choice in practically every situation, but you know I'm a descriptive grammar fanatic! Emotion: wink

Anyway, the poster seems to be more interested in what's considered correct in common standard English than in what native speakers say, since it seems he's a native speaker himself. So the answer for him is that he should say "even better" and not "more better".
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