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I'm taking care of my dog, infected with a virus.


As you see, "infected with a virus" is used non-restrictively to modify "my dog".

But is it possible to say so?

Could you provide similiar examples as well?

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No: it's ungrammatical. You need "I'm taking care of my dog, who is infected with a virus."


Note that non restrictive items are not modifiers.

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fire1infected with a virus.

This is not a common way of saying it. You could say who has a virus instead.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
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fire1I'm taking care of my dog, infected with a virus.

That almost sounds like you are infected with a virus.

CJ

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fire1Could you provide similiar examples as well?

As has been mentioned by others, your sentence does not work. A structurally similar example that works tolerably well might be something like "I saw a huddled group of children, deserted and abandoned".

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fire1Can a "past participle phrase" be used non-restrictively?

Yes.

Godzilla, created by Toho Studio in Japan, first appeared in 1954.

CJ

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