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Hello, everyone:

Normally we say "I'll try to phone you during the meeting.", but can't we say"I'll try to phone you in the meeting."?

Another question is which of the following sentences are correct?

He was injured in the match.

He was injured during the match.

He was on the bench in the match.

He was on the bench during the match.

The boys played in the afternoon.

The boys played during the afternoon.

Come to see me in the afternoon.

Come to see me during the afternoon.

Thank you very much!!Emotion: smile

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Hi,

Normally we say "I'll try to phone you during the meeting.", but can't we say"I'll try to phone you in the meeting."? Yes, you hear people say both.

Another question is which of the following sentences are correct?

He was injured in the match. Sounds like he was playing.

He was injured during the match. Maybe he was playing, maybe watching.

He was on the bench in the match. Doesn't sound good.

He was on the bench during the match. OK

The boys played in the afternoon. OK

The boys played during the afternoon. OK

Come to see me in the afternoon. OK

Come to see me during the afternoon. OK

Clive
Comments  
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Thank you, Clive! That's very helpful.
"I'll try to phone you during the meeting."
"you" may not join the meeting.

"I'll try to phone you in the meeting."?
Both "I" and "you" will join the meeting.

He was injured in the match.
He played the match.

He was injured during the match.
He played or not.

He was on the bench in the match.
If he really played the match, he should have not been on the bench.

He was on the bench during the match.
Ok, perhaps he was watching the match.

The boys played in the afternoon.
Yes, correct.

The boys played during the afternoon.
It sounds weired.

Come to see me in the afternoon.
Yes, correct.

Come to see me during the afternoon.
It sounds weired.