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I don't know if I can do it but I'll ____ a go.

have
make
give

He ____ gone to work yesterday. John was there all day and nobody saw him.

mustn't have
can't have
wasn't have

Can you tell me when ____ leaving?

does the plane
the plane is
is the plane

Argentina, ____ is well-known for its mountains, is a very popular with ski-tourists.

which
that
who

This fish is _____ delicious.

very
really
completely

It's about time we _____ - it's nearly midnight

leave
left
to leave
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Comments  
Anybusy;

Please pick your answers first. Then we can comment on them.
You will learn much more from the exercise by following AlphecaEmotion: star's advice.
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The one with the star is the correct answer! Can you explain to me why? Thanks!

I don't know if I can do it but I'll ____ a go.

*have
make
give

He ____ gone to work yesterday. John was there all day and nobody saw him.

mustn't have
*can't have
wasn't have

Can you tell me when ____ leaving?

does the plane
*the plane is
is the plane

Argentina, ____ is well-known for its mountains, is a very popular with ski-tourists.

*which
that
who

This fish is ___ delicious.

very
*really
completely

It's about time we ___ - it's nearly midnight

leave
*left
to leave
andybusyI don't know if I can do it but I'll ____ a go.
I'll __give it__ a go.

Make a go is not idiomatic.

Have a go must be British English. I use "give it a go."
andybusyHe ____ gone to work yesterday. John was there all day and nobody saw him.
As an American English speaker, I use mustn't have or couldn't have, and rarely, can't have. British English apparently uses can't have.
andybusyCan you tell me when ____ leaving?
Indirect questions use the normal subject-verb order.
andybusyArgentina, ____ is well-known for its mountains, is a very popular with ski-tourists.
Nonessential (non-defining, non-restrictive) relative clauses, which are set off by commas, do not use "that."
Who refers to people.
andybusyThis fish is ___ delicious.
I have no problem with very or really.
andybusyIt's about time we ___ - it's nearly midnight
Subjunctive mood showing a suggestion for action.
Here are some examples of the subjunctive:
http://www.ceafinney.com/subjunctive/examples.html
AlpheccaStarsHave a go must be British English
It is.
AlpheccaStarsAs an American English speaker, I use mustn't have or couldn't have, and rarely, can't have. British English apparently uses can't have.
Yes. For us, can't have is the most likely; couldn't have is possible; mustn't have is pretty unlikely.
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andybusyIt's about time we ___ - it's nearly midnight
For me, both leave and left work here.
Aspara Gus andybusyIt's about time we ___ - it's nearly midnightFor me, both leave and left work here.
That would be completely wrong in BrE. For us, it's:

It's (about/high) time we left.
It's (about/high) time (for us) to leave.
To Fivejedjon

What is the different between using to leave and left, one is using "infinitive to" and the other is using a past participle to describe an action in here!?

Can you further explain your point of view in here by using the two different verb form(to leave/left), also what is the meaning of saying It's (high) time we left?

Cheers

Andy
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