+0
If a stewardess in a plane ask two of us what we would like for lunch. "Noodle or rice?" she asks. And our choices are rice. Can I say: "Two rice, please." ?

Well, what is the usual and simple expression of "two sets of rice"? I am not saying about "two bowls of rice", since these are set-meals in plane.

If I say "two rices", does that mean just two grains of rice?

And if we choose noodle, what should I say? "Two noodle" or "two noodles"?

I am really confused. Please give me some illustrative examples. Thanks.
+0
Two servings/helpings of rice
Two rice dishes

depending on the circumstances.
+0
I think it would also be very natural to just say 'two rice' or 'two noodles' or 'one rice and one noodles'.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Comments  
Thank you, Marius Hancu.
 nona the brit's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
nona the britI think it would also be very natural to just say 'two rice' or 'two noodles' or 'one rice and one noodles'.
I just saw it. Thank you very much, Nona the Brit.

And the story is that I have heard someone said "two rice", but she wasn't a native speaker of English.