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If I want to put these "yellow shirt", "red cap" and "holding a pen" altogether in one sentence, how should I do it?

"There is a group of people dressed in a yellow shirt, a red cap, and each holding a pen in their hand."

or

"There is a group of people dressed in yellow shirts, red caps, and holding a pen in their hands."

or

"There is a group of people dressed in yellow shirts, red caps, and holding pens in their hands."

or

"There is a group of people dressed in the same yellow shirt and red cap, and each holding a pen in their hand."

As you can see, I'm trying various combinations... Emotion: smile

How would you tackle this?
Comments  
My attempt would be:

There is a group of people where each is dressed in a yellow shirt, a red cap, and holding a pen in their hand.
or "each of whom is dressed in a yellow shirt and red cap while holding a pen."
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Hi,

If I want to put these "yellow shirt", "red cap" and "holding a pen" altogether in one sentence, how should I do it?

Unless you want to focus on a group, how about the simpler Tom is dressed in a yellow shirt and red cap, and holding a pen ?

Clive


so if I really want to focus on the group as a whole without breaking it down into individual levels (using "each of whom", "where each is...", etc.), how would I do it so it doesn't sound awkward?
"...each of whom is wearing a yellow shirt and red cap and holding a pen."
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They were wearing yellow shirts and red caps, and holding pens.