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Can someone please explain me the usage for "/"?

For example, in the sentences:

"You are a great professor/teacher!"

"He said he will kill/murder me tomorrow."

"Students will have multiple online classes per subject/per week."

"We will be playing soccer/football."
"Students are expected to show up to all of their online classes/do their assignments."


Thanks!

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Can someone please explain me the usage for "/"?

"Explain me" is not good English.


The slash mark has a variety of uses. It can represent "and" or "or" or a division in math. But never use a slash mark in formal writing unless if it is used in the instructions.

The sports car can reach a maximum speed of 200 km/hour.

For example, categories in tables, pie charts and other figures use slash marks.

"You are a great professor/teacher!"

"You are a great professor and teacher!"

"He said he will kill/murder me tomorrow."

Incorrect usage. This is correct:

He said he will kill, in other words, murder, me tomorrow.

"Students will have multiple online classes per subject/per week."

Incorrect usage. This is correct:

Students will have multiple online classes per subject per week.

"We will be playing soccer/football."

Incorrect usage. These are correct:

"We will be playing soccer and football."

"We will be playing soccer or football."

"Students are expected to show up to all of their online classes/do their assignments."

Incorrect usage. This is correct:

Students are expected to show up to all of their online classes and do their assignments.

Comments  

That use of the slash is to be avoided. It disrupts the writing and is often not clear. There are no conventions for its use because it is such a poor device. You sometimes see it in "and/or", and people actually use that (and even say it), but it too is to be avoided. None of your sentences are correct even if you allow it, though, except maybe "professor/teacher". People sometimes say "slash" facetiously in a case like that: "You are a great professor slash teacher." meaning that he can be described equally well by either title, except that they pretty much mean the same thing.

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 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.

For example, categories in tables, pie charts and other figures use slash marks.

In the table, are the slashes “and”?

"You are a great professor and teacher!"

Shouldn’t it be “or” because someone may be a teacher, but not a professor?

Shouldn’t it be “or” because someone may be a teacher, but not a professor?

No.

1. You are a great professor. = The person has a professorship job at a university and he is good at his job.

2. You are a great teacher!

A teacher is anyone who teaches. A mother can teach her children. Very few teachers are professors.

There are professors who are good researchers, but not good teachers.


3. You are a great professor and teacher!

This is praising a professor who can do great research and also is a great teacher.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

So you would only write “You are a great teacher/professor” to a professor?

So you would only write “You are a great teacher/professor”

No.

I would write, “You are a great teacher, Professor Krauss.”

By what I meant wass would you only write "You would only write "You are a great teacher/professor" to a professor? Not a teacher?

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
"You would only write "You are a great teacher/professor" to a professor? Not a teacher?

I would not use the slash sign in writing to anyone.

Generally a teacher is not a professor.

Do not call a teacher a professor unless they are one, or you are making a joke.