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I learned in this great website (I just found out about it today), that the plural of status is 'statuses.' I don't know what you think, but in my personal opinion this sounds horribleEmotion: ick!! If the plural ofAlumnus is Alumni, why can't we apply the same rule with Status? I bet that's the way the Romans did it.Emotion: stick out tongue
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Hi,
can I take advantage of this thread to ask... about cactus and similar words?

I just read GG said the plural of cactus is cacti, but in dictionaries you'll also find "or cactuses". The same is true for a lot of similar words, for example "formula" and "antenna", which could be end in "ae" in the plural, or just become "formulas" and "antennas".

But I feel those "latin plurals" are too formal for everyday English, so I think teachers and professors normally say "formulas", unless they really want to sound (overly) formal.

So the question is... Do you ask your husband, an electrician, etc. to check the antennae on the roof? Or antennas? I think it's "antennas". And do you say "Damn! Watch out Bob! Slow down, or we're gonna crash into some cacti!"? Or cactuses?

Thanks. Emotion: smile
Well, I just used "cacti" because anonymous did. I don't have too many opportunities to talk about one cactus, let alone a pethora of them. (I think I might also treat it like moose. Hey, look at all the cactus. I'm sure that's wrong, but I can see it happening.)

Someone did once use "antennae" with me and I did think they were being overly formal. And the other night, I noticed there was only one string bass player, but six cellos (not celli) at my daughter's concernt.

I've NEVER seen formulae outside of a textbook.

People cling to things for all sorts of reasons.
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I see, perfect.
Latin plurals are ok in formal written English, but in everyday English they sound too formal, as you say.
When I read this thread, I was thinking of a cowboy in the middle of a desert in a Western movie. I couldn't imagine him saying "cacti", LOL.
Grammar Geek(I think I might also treat it like moose. Hey, look at all the cactus. I'm sure that's wrong, but I can see it happening.)
Hmm, no, I don't think that's wrong. Merriam Webster says --> Plural: "cacti" or "cactuses", also "cactus". So "cactus" can be plural too.

Anyway, let's hope I won't ever have to use "cactus" in the plural. If I have to, I think I'll say one or the other.
Thanks a lot. Emotion: smile
KooyeenMerriam Webster says --> Plural: "cacti" or "cactuses", also "cactus". So "cactus" can be plural too.

Whew! That's a relief.

Hey, look out for all those moose!
KooyeenHmm, no, I don't think that's wrong. Merriam Webster says --> Plural: "cacti" or "cactuses", also "cactus". So "cactus" can be plural too.

Anyway, let's hope I won't ever have to use "cactus" in the plural. If I have to, I think I'll say one or the other.
In Helsinki English (where all kinds of peculiarities exist) I might say "cactisuses". Emotion: smile I'm sure no one would like it, though. Emotion: sad

CB
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I believe it would be Spaghetti-O's. Just ask Chef-Boy-R-Dee.
The noun status is fourth declension, as has been pointed out, so the plural is status (with a hard U) in latin. It's first declension as an adjective, so if you like the way things were yesterday, the day before, and the day before that, then you're a fan of the stati qui. Now that sounds wierd.