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Hello, good people of EnglishForward. I would like to solve this one problem I've had for years. So, I've spoken English for about a decade and as a non-native English speaker, I had had some tutors years ago to improve my English skills. One of them once told me that he could not think of a situation in which 'that' (as in 'that' clause) could not be omitted. For example, if I wanted to say "I like the fact that I have enough time for this project.", I could also say "I like the fact I have enough time for this project." To give another example, it is fine to say "Do you know I was so worried about you?" instead of "Do you know that I was so worried about you?" Surely, according to him, omitting 'that' may cause confusion in terms of contextual meaning of the sentence but would not be grammatically incorrect. Can someone clarify/approve of/deny his claim? Any example / explanation would be appreciated. Thank you in advance for sparing me your precious time.
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Comments  
As the subject of a sentence, the initial that in a that-clause cannot be omitted. As an object, it generally can. There are probably exceptions, though.

That John Doe was the murderer was rumored a long time before his arrest.
The question was actually written by me right before I decided to register for the forum.

I clearly see that initiative 'that' cannot be omitted. If omitted, it just sounds wrong.

I really appreciate your kind reply but would you please find some occasions where objective 'that' cannot be omitted?

Thank you!
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clee102The question was actually written by me right before I decided to register for the forum.
Welcome to English Forums!
clee102I really appreciate your kind reply but would you please find some occasions where objective 'that' cannot be omitted?
See this reference, point "D".
http://faculty.deanza.edu/flemingjohn/stories/storyReader$23
Thanks for such a warm welcome!

Ah ha..!

I guess that point "D" settles it.

Thank you so much for your precious time and effort !
Anonymousif I wanted to say "I like the fact that I have enough time for this project.", I could also say "I like the fact I have enough time for this project."
You could, but it wouldn’t be very natural. It’s almost never a good idea to omit that after fact.
Anonymousit is fine to say "Do you know I was so worried about you?" instead of "Do you know that I was so worried about you?"
You’re right.
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clee102please find some occasions where objective 'that' cannot be omitted
Objective 'that'? Never heard of it.

that is not omitted

1) when it's the subject of a relative clause
2) in a sentence-initial content clause
3) in a content clause which is in apposition (mostly not omitted1)

The book that is on the table has a green cover.
That he was too late to save the child was unfortunate.
The idea that gold can be made from lead has been disproved.

CJ

1The absence of 'that' may be used to block, even if weakly, a content-clause interpretation of a relative clause.

the proposition he was advancing - relative clause interpretation more likely than content clause?
the proposition that he was advancing - content clause interpretation more likely than or as likely as relative clause?

CJ
Thank you for your reply, good sir / ma'am !

I suppose the word objective I used was probably something I made up to fit in the context.

You know.. um.. something like..

"What he's trying to say is that..."

In that sentence, 'that' clause is like an object (maybe it is..?)

I appreciate your effort to provide examples and they are quite helpful.

However, if I may ask one more thing, wouldn't omitting 'that' in your third example still be possible?

I mean, even to me, it certainly is awkward to do so but wouldn't it.. somehow make sense?

Or is it just a taboo ?
clee102wouldn't omitting 'that' in your third example still be possible?
Yes, you can do it, but you don't see 'that' omitted very often in that grammatical situation, so I use 'that' myself just so I don't write something that sticks out like a sore thumb to others. Emotion: smile

CJ
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